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Archive for the ‘Cyclescape (campaigner toolkit)’ Category

Making data more usable by campaigners: our Outlandish Fellowship

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

We’re really pleased to announce that we’ve been selected for the Outlandish Fellowship to help local cycle campaigners by expanding our collisions data pages into a broader resource covering more types of data (e.g. traffic counts, pollution) and add lots of new ways to access it.

Helping campaigners campaign

Getting more people cycling brings a more sustainable and efficient transport system, improved public health, and greater access to employment. However, in the UK, cities have failed to make space for cycling on our streets, preventing mass uptake.

We know from our own activity as campaigners in Cambridge, that making a good evidence­-base for reallocating roadspace or challenging poor developments involves significant work. For instance, developers often claim that their route has “good connections to the local cycle network” whereas in practice we know that this often means a shared-use path that is hard to access.

We lack the data to make a strong case that, for instance, a combination of a high collision rate, congestion, pollution in an area means that a developer or a Local Authority needs to improve their plans. Of course there remains the need for making arguments based on broader policy, such as that cycling should be prioritised as a positive and healthy form of transport, but hard data for specific cases helps backs this up.

What kind of data is out there?

There’s lots out there that could be useful for cycle campaigning. Things like collision data (which we’ve already done a bit of work on), traffic count data, travel time data, census travel data, on-street counts, etc. Imagine if, instead of having to search these out and find someone technical to process it, you could simply point and click, with national coverage?

Collisions

This data is becoming available but it’s very scattered, meaning that correlations are hard to make. It’s often in raw formats that need significant work before it can be understood, or hidden in Local Authority websites that are not sufficiently flexible or easy for non-specialists to use. Often it’s not arranged for the kinds of tasks that cycle campaigners specifically need.

We’re aiming over time to build up a multi­functional resource to help build this case, enabling users to a build and link to an interactive display of the relevant data (involving multiple layers, clickable points, reports, summary info) for a particular location or route, that they can use in their advocacy and liaison work.

Mark, better known as ‘Ranty Highwayman’ in cycle planning circles, said:

“The project looks really exciting. From my point of view, the ability to generate information from one place is a great idea as at the moment, it’s a really labour-intensive process, this could create maps for reports, committee papers etc.”

Our plan is that it would be available for embedding in local campaign websites, exporting to reports, used in apps, and so on.

Some examples

Here are just a few sample stories that we’ve come across in our own work as cycle campaigners, some from Cambridge:

  • Justification of removal of one-way street restrictions for cycling. In previous decades, traffic planning favoured one-way streets as a way to regularise traffic flows and avoid rat-running. However, the side-effect is to stop easy cycling. If we could compare collision data easily in a particular location, we could show how streets that have been made two-way for cycling haven’t caused a safety hazard.
  • Worsened likelihood of collisions in areas with an existing poor record. A supermarket developer wanted to open a local store under a just-in-time delivery regime in a high street with a narrow carriageway that has heavy traffic and high pedestrian and cycle flows. A good evidence base, combining flow level data, Origin/Destination data, collisions and traffic data delay data, would have enabled us to argue that the developer will need to amend their delivery plans to be more sympathetic to the local circumstances.
  • Higher levels of pollution in areas with significant problems already. Areas with many schools particularly need to avoid pollution. A developer proposes a new estate in such an area but fails to provide good connections into the site for walking and cycling. A better evidence base, combining socio-economic data, school travel data, pollution and cycling levels would help us convince the Local Authority that the developer needs to provide this connectivity.

What changes can people expect?

We’ve started from our collision data viewer as the base, and to this we’re adding:

  • Completely reworking the search facility so that it’s actually useful – currently it’s stuck in a prototyped state, with lots of non-useful fields. This will mean that common scenarios like “Collisions between a date range in area X” are possible.
  • Adding typical scenarios as new front-end ways to access it. Currently, it’s very map-based, whereas we want to enable common use-cases much more easily.
  • Making everything Local Authority -aware. Currently it’s all manual boundaries, but we’d like users to be able to do things like compare casualty rates (and other data – see below) between areas.
  • Upgrading the interface. We’ve now got some nice new icons for a start :)
  • Adding a better way to import the data. Currently, updating it each year is not as easy as we’d like, and new data types (see below) need to be supported.
  • Adding generalised origin-destination data for areas, using analysis from our own journey planner
  • Adding traffic count data, from the DfT
  • More data (in future – after the current Fellowship work)
  • Adding the ability to switch between multiple layers of data
  • Making all the above available through a more generalised Advocacy data API. In fact, this will be the system powering all the above!
  • Adding the ability to embed custom views of the data in other sites

The code will be open source too :)

We’ll be giving updates via this blog over the coming 6 weeks – stay tuned!

Collisions

Blackfriars Bridge, scene of many unfortunate collisions over many years. With the new data platform, it will be possible to make easy comparisons about how the introduction of the new Dutch-standard cycle infrastructure just built reduces these collisions.

Outlandish

OutlandishOutlandish is a web agency based in Finsbury Park, down the train from us in Cambridge. The members of Outlandish want to unleash technology’s potential to make the world a fairer, better place. It’s a worker co-operative and invests all surpluses into projects that help achieve the members’ goals. They build digital applications and websites for companies, charities and universities that make their lives easier and help them to discover and communicate new insights from their data.

Outlandish has made available fellowships for people who are using the Internet and digital technologies to address social issues. The fellowships include funding and other forms of support to allow participants to start their own projects. The aim of the fellowship is to support work that matches the mission of Outlandish, and to expand the network of people that they actively collaborate with.

We’re really proud to be in the first set of Fellows, and it’s going to be great to be working with a co-op!

  
Photos from the launch of the Outlandish Fellowhip

Our project team

Our main developer on this project is Martin, doing most of the work, as the Outlandish Fellow.

He’s being helped by Simon (CycleStreets’ other principal developer), when he can be wrestled away from interesting routing quality challenges like turn delays that we’ve been working on recently.

We’ve also set up a Stakeholder board, to ensure that the data work we’re doing is genuinely useful. This is:

New features added to Cyclescape

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

Lots of new features have been added to Cyclescape, our toolkit for cycling advocacy groups.

Our developer, Nikolai, has been busy, working on piles of improvements and bugfixes.

As featured on the Cyclescape blog, the latest updates include:

Street View message replies: While it’s of course possible to navigate off-site, get a Street View link, and return, we’ve taken out that extra stage. The Street View button also tries to find a sensible default location. In a thread, just click on Street View in the reply box, position the map where you want, add a comment and press submit.

Privacy improvements:  Some groups have told us that it is important to them that they are able to operate on the basis of member discussions using real names, so that members know who they are talking to. However, we recognise that this could be in conflict with the entirely reasonable desire not to have one’s name on the public internet if wished. Accordingly, we have worked to implement a solution to this, whereby you can set your real name which people in your groups will see, but set a display name for everyone else. Previously the display name was always used.

Improvements for groups: If you didn’t already know, cycling groups are able to create their own Cyclescape space, giving a custom web address and various personalisations. You can now create a group using the ‘Request new group’ form in the top-right of the groups gallery. Groups can now add a photo to help personalise their page, alongside information about the group.

Search system overhauled to give much better results: We’ve replaced the search result system with a completely new engine that gives much better results. After a week of tuning the results, we think this now seems to find what you’re looking for pretty consistently. Secondly, we’ve added pagination, so you’re no longer limited to one page of results. Another long-awaited improvement is that searches within a group’s area will only return results from that area. So if you’re in, say, Camden Cyclists’ Cyclescape area, you won’t get results polluted with issues from Cambridge, Sheffield, Leeds, or wherever.

Getting discussions by e-mail now better: Did you know that you can also get Cyclescape discussions by e-mail? In fact, Cyclescape can be used like lots of mini e-mail lists, which you can choose to subscribe/unsubscribe to on a per-thread basis. We’ve made a number of improvements. Firstly, you can now enable digests, so you can read what’s happening by getting a single e-mail a day. Next, e-mails are now properly threaded. Also, we’ve added deadline reminders, so you’ll get a reminder a day or two before a date in a thread you’re subscribed to. So fewer excuses for missing deadlines now! A further improvement is that new users, and users newly-subscribed to a group, now receive a welcome e-mail to confirm each of these.

Deadline management improvements: In case you didn’t know, your ‘My Cyclescape’ page has a listing of all the deadlines/dates in the threads you are subscribed to. So it’s easy to get an overview of what’s coming up. We’ve added an iCal feed, so that if you use a calendaring system like Apple Calendar, Google Calendar, Outlook, etc., you can have these events appear automatically in your calendar. Also, if you have e-mail enabled, each deadline/date e-mail will now include an iCal attachment for that deadline/date. Another improvement is that you can now specify a time, rather than purely just a day, when replying in a thread.

Planning application integration now live

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Cross-posted from the Cyclescape blog.

We’re very excited to announce a major new feature on Cyclescape: integration of planning applications, which we pushed live last week after much work over the last 18 months.

Cambridge Cycling Campaign is the group we’ve been testing this with and where the work has mainly been undertaken.

The feature means that group members will be able to know about a new planning application within a day of it being submitted to the council. This gives potentially an extra 6 weeks of time to study a planning application, so that the group can see:

  • how it could affect cycling conditions in an area
  • whether measures are needed (Section 106 / CIL funding) to mitigate any problems
  • whether cycle parking is sufficient
  • whether it could create opportunities such as a new route

This is 6 weeks of extra time to talk to the developers, and the Council, rather than deal with everything last minute – e.g. just before it goes to Planning Committee, as has happened in the past!

List of planning applications, from the ‘My Cyclescape’ page:

Planning applications

Click on ‘Convert to an issue’, and this pre-fills the usual issue form:

Cloned planning application

As there is no way for us to determine automatically (yet) whether a planning application is relevant – and there is a lot of irrelevant stuff like tree works – we have provided a button to enable an application to be hidden. If enough users in the group vote to hide the application, it will be hidden for all. In this way, group users can crowdsource relevant applications, and make it faster for others to work through to find relevant things.

Al this has been possible thanks to work by our contact Andrew who is working on a new planning application data portal, PlanIt (building on an earlier system by Openly Local), which we in CycleStreets are hoping to collaborate on and support formally.

Not all areas of the country are yet covered – Cambridge, featured above, has been specially funded. We’d like to thank Cambridge Sustainable City for their grant support.

Get in touch with us if you are interested to have coverage in your area in future.

We’d like to thank our developers Andy Allan and Nikolai Berkoff, as well as Andrew Speakman whose work has made this possible.

Cyclescape: More features in place

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Cyclescape is the toolkit for cycle campaign groups that we’re developing. Here’s the latest update, cross-posted from the Cyclescape blog:


Work is continuing apace with Cyclescape, with more features now in place as we work up to a wider release to Campaign groups around the country.

There are still quite a number of unfinished areas, but we’re getting there. Andrew and (most recently) Andy have been busy adding more in place for us.

  • Deadline setting
  • Collision data
  • Per-thread attachments
  • Committee-only privacy setting
  • Popular issues

Read about these below:

Deadline setting:

Deadlines (or other dates) can now be set.

Our experience of cycle campaigning is that it’s often easy to miss a consultation deadline or some other date, if there’s a lot going on. By then, it’s too late, and the opportunity to see improvements to cycling are missed.

The set dates are now listed in ‘My Cyclescape’, the user’s main summary area. We’ll be developing this interface further.

Collision data:

Collision data is now integrated, using a new data feed from CycleStreets, and linking through to their collision reports.

This feature has been developed for the Cambridge group, pushed forward because of the large number of planning applications in that area, for which collision data can often provide a useful context.

Development of this feature, and various underlying code pre-requisites, has been possible thanks to a grant from Cambridge Sustainable City, whose support has been invaluable.

This screenshot, for instance, shows the site of collisions in Mill Road, an area subject to continuing pressures on cyclists from lorries. Several planning applications in recent years would have benefitted from this data being available.

The finalised interface for collisions isn’t quite in place yet – buttons for this will be added to finish it off.

Per-thread attachments:

Attachments can now be added to individual discussion threads. Previously the only way to add an attachment was to add it to the Library, which is always public.

Currently there is a slight limitation that, if e-mailing to the discussion thread (since you can reply to things via e-mail, not just via the website), attachments do not get through. We’re working on this!

Committee-only privacy setting:

There are now three privacy options for each discussion thread:

  • Public (publicly visible)
  • Group (i.e. available to all members of the group)
  • Committee (available only to current Committee members)

The latter option means that groups can discuss sensitive matters in privacy if required, e.g. pre-consultation plans from a developer.

There is a setting in the group’s area which sets the default (public/group) when their members start a discussion thread.

Cyclescape has a voting system, which now results in a list of popular items, ensuring that key strategic issues can stay floated to the top.

More will be done to expose this feature in due course, as the rest of the interface is improved, but the underlying functionality is now in place.

 

The What’s New? link at the end of each page on the site has a log of individual features and bugfixes as they are put in.

Bit by bit, the site’s functionality and interface is falling into place!

In our next Cyclescape blog post we’ll talk about what we’re currently working on, i.e. what’s missing and what’s not yet finished.

UK Collision Map – a new resource for the cycle campaigning community

Friday, March 30th, 2012

We’re pleased to launch today a new resource for the cycling community: a browsable, searchable collision map with complete details of every reported road collision involving cyclists in the UK since 2005. This will also be integrated into our new campaigning toolkit being finalised, Cyclescape.

www.cyclestreets.net/collisions

Not only can you browse around the map, but you can also:

  • Select areas to get all the details of each collision in that area (see screenshot below)
  • View full details of each collision and its associated vehicles and people involved
  • Export the data to a spreadsheet
  • Drill down through the data (which will soon be linked with the geographical view)
  • Search the data

At present the map view is limited to cycle collisions (but the search interface can retrieve others).

This new facility has been possible thanks to power of Open Data – in the form of the recent release by the government of STATS19 data. STATS19 is the system used by the Police to record details of each collision and, as part of that, each vehicle and person involved. The dataset is incredibly detailed, and so we want to help campaigners make sense of it.

In our work to compile the data, we’ve gone a step further and added the drawing, export and search tools (as we had existing code to make that fairly easy to add).

You can click on any point to see a summary of key details, and then click to view the full report, each of which has a stable URL for future linking:

   

The main driver for this work has been to create a data interface (API) for Cyclescape, our campaigning toolkit, which will shortly have the ability to press a button to view collision data around the area of an issue (e.g. a poor junction) being discussed by campaigners. For the Cambridge area, this work to integrate it into Cyclescape is being funded by Cambridge Sustainable City, as part of a set of improvements that are desperately needed by Cambridge Cycling Campaign for a range of campaigns on longer lorries, huge planning applications and junction problems.

We’ve therefore created and documented an API that exposes the data. (We cannot guarantee the API will be stable until a few weeks’ time.)

Lastly – partly to help with testing – there is also a detailed search, which will shortly be integrated more fully with the geographical drawing facility.

Do let us have your feedback and let us know what you’d like to prioritise next. Stabilisation of the API will be our foremost priority in the short term.

We’ll be considering whether to take into account this data into the journey planner engine. As cycle campaigners ourselves, we know that collision data is subject to considerable under-reporting, and thus we would need a high statistical significance to use it for that purpose.

Designer needed! – Cyclescape design brief

Friday, October 28th, 2011

We are seeking a talented designer with strong user interface abilities to undertake design work for the new Cyclescape website. Timescales are tight. Cyclescape is to be a website (currently under construction) aimed at helping cycling groups around the UK. The work will involve the creation of an overall design concept, plus user interface templates for each of the user pages, and an icon set.

Read more on the Cyclescape website …

What’s the Cyclescape of your city like?

Friday, October 21st, 2011

We’re pleased to announce the name of our new cycle campaign group toolkit:

Cyclescape

We had over 70 suggestions (including some humorous ones), many of which were excellent ideas.

It became clear that many of the best ideas started with Cycle, and we liked the idea that the name would be co-branded with CycleStreets, i.e. Cycle-s-something.

We also thought it was particularly important to emphasise the geographical aspect of cycle campaigning. We thought that inventing a new word, Cyclescape would be a catchy and unique brand that emphasises the idea of improving the landscape for cycling across our towns and cities.

Having fixed on a shortlist, we began the process of trying to obtain domain names. This took a surprising amount of work as we wanted to ensure we got all the variants (.com/.net/.org) by way of brand protection.

Unlike three years ago when we bought the name CycleStreets, many Cycle+<something> names have now been taken and reserved by domain brokers. After approaching some domain holders, it was clear that some of the best names were going to be prohibitively expensive, in the thousands of pounds, which was well beyond an already-tight budget.

In the end we spent more than we wanted to acquiring the name, but we’re very pleased with it. We hope you like the name too!

Cyclescape.net is currently under development and we’ll be setting up a blog there shortly. @Cyclescape will also be the site’s Twitter identity, so do follow that also.

Andy and Andrew, our developers, have been making excellent progress. Many of the core concepts of the site are in place, so we’ll have screenshots of  the system at ‘alpha’ phase in the next few days. If you’re a coder, follow the code work in progress on Github.

Now we need a logo…

Now we need a logo! We like the idea of a curved section of city, with markers on and a bicycle going upwards. Anyone able to help with that?


CycleStreets has secured £27,000 of funding as a winner of Geovation – GeoVation is an Ordnance Survey initiative and forms part of the Ideas in Transit project with funding from the Technology Strategy Board and the Department for Transport.

Cycle campaign toolkit: introducing our developer team

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

GeoVation

Progress on our cycle campaigner toolkit is steaming (pedalling?) ahead! Coding work began on Monday, and will continue solidly for the next few months.

The development of the toolkit has been possible thanks to our GeoVation award, which secured us £27,000 of funding. GeoVation is an Ordnance Survey initiative and forms part of the Ideas in Transit project with funding from the Technology Strategy Board and the Department for Transport.

We're pleased to introduce our developer team, Andy Allan, Andrew France, plus myself (Martin Lucas-Smith) from CycleStreets as project manager. Andy and Andrew will be working in it on solidly for the next few months so that a large amount of development can be done.

We're also approaching various designers and design companies for the work on the design and information architecture aspects of the project.

Andy Allan is a freelance developer and cartographer, specialising in all things related to OpenStreetMap. He is the creator of opencyclemap.org, the award-winning map for cyclists used by hundreds of websites and mobile applications, along with his recently developed transport map. He has helped develop the technology that powers OpenStreetMap including the online editor, Potlatch2, and is a member of the OSMF Operations Working Group. Andy lives and works in London but prefers cycling elsewhere.

Andrew France is an experienced web application developer specialising in Ruby on Rails. A generalist by nature, he is just as happy designing intuitive front-end interfaces and writing JavaScript as he is constructing database schema. Andrew has worked on a variety of systems from charity sites to hazardous chemicals management and always looks forward to implementing new ideas. He is a keen traveller, cyclist, runner, and imbiber of ale.

Martin Lucas-Smith is one of the two lead developers of CycleStreets. He'll be project-managing the toolkit project and getting involved in the Rails coding in the latter half of the project. For CycleStreets, Martin tends to deal with non-routing code and structure of the CycleStreets codebase; he also deals with most of the CycleStreets project management so that fellow developer Simon can concentrate on the complex routing work. Martin's actual job is as a Web Developer at the Department of Geography , University of Cambridge.

Get involved in an exciting open source project!

The toolkit is to be developed as an open source project, with the code on Github. It will be written using the technologies of Ruby on Rails (v3.1), PostgreSQL, and jQuery.

Volunteers are needed to contribute to the code from the end of October. If you'd be interested, do let us know.

We're aiming to build a project team who will develop and look after the system from December onwards. By that stage, the grant-funded development work will mean that the system is already fully-featured and well coded so should be in a good state to add functionality to.

Timeline

We'll have:

  • Screenshots of our 'alpha' available by 21st October.
  • A beta available to a few campaign groups from by 4th November. If your group would like to be a 'guinea-pig', do let us know! We'll start to open it up to more groups in the month following.
  • General availability of the site around 2nd December, with bugfixes and additional features leading to the week before Christmas.

Stay tuned to this blog and our Twitter feed for updates.

We're also seeking an additional grant of around £10k to enable us to undertake solid coding on some of the more advanced features that groups have suggested, particularly do deal with more complex issues like cross-group sharing, which will increase the utility of the system considerably.

Designing the toolkit

We held our first developer meetings this week to develop the specification further and do some wireframing:

   

   

Cycle campaign toolkit – spec

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

We're pleased to publish an updated specification for the campaigner toolkit, following consultation with groups and including further changes.

There's been lots of useful feedback submitted by e-mail, twitter, blog replies, and in meetings we've had. These comments were turned into about ten pages of bullet-points (165 points!) for working into the spec.

Many of the points raised were useful points for clarification, or small new features, and a few raised issues relating to group structure. There were no problems raised with the substantive direction and nature of the toolkit.

The Description of the toolkit and what it will do is still available and has not needed to be updated. However, the full detailed functional specification has been updated and is below.

We were delighted to receive various positive comments which very much reflect our hopes for the system. For instance:

"One great advantage I can see is that it'll potentially help balance out the workload within our cycle campaign by allowing the latest status on any particular issue to always be seen on the system. Getting more campaign member involvement will also help with our committee's workload."

"I like the push/pull options of mail list and forum. Can't think of anything you've missed. I'm hopeful that this will encourage common issues to do with rules or conventions to float to the top and be tackled at source."

Things that have been updated or added in the spec, as a result of the consultation are:

  • Clarification of the idea of a 'Library' of best practice
  • Presence of tips to help best practice in campaigning
  • Specification of the polls and petitions components
  • Issues relating to federated/overlapping groups
  • Committee privacy basis
  • Notion of groups having democratically-agreed policy stances that members must adhere to
  • Clarifications about grouping and splitting of threads
  • Ability to involve elected Councillors rather than just officers
  • Tightening of a few areas regarding mail integration
  • Emphasis on outcomes rather than endless discussion
  • Notion of cross-member 'recommended campaign' topics
  • Daily digest
  • Removal of the notion of a compromise objective, which could undermine a group's negotiating position
  • Addition of avoidance of uploading very large volumes of documents, which could create costs
  • And various other minor changes

The latest version of the specification is available. It is now a living document that incorporates updates in the light of implementation as we move into the coding/design phase.

A draft Module structure (work in progress) which describes an implementation of the functional specification, is being finalised. This will form the basis of the developers' work.

CycleStreets has secured £27,000 of funding as a winner of Geovation – GeoVation is an Ordnance Survey initiative and forms part of the Ideas in Transit project with funding from the Technology Strategy Board and the Department for Transport.

We need a name for our campaigning toolkit!

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

Since we won £27,000 for the development of our campaigning toolkit we've been pondering what to call it.

The themes we want to capture in the name are:

  • The idea of a central place where cycle users around the UK can submit problems they encounter on the street network
  • A central place to facilitate campaigning
  • Cycling (!)
  • Collaborative
  • Well-informed campaigning
  • Constructive and forceful debate but without being adversarial
  • Improving our streets and routes
  • Keeping track of all the problems and being able to manage them effectively
  • The ability to say "I'll report it on the … website" and write "Go to … to report/fix a problem"
  • Name needs to be short and catchy – long names are harder to type in

Here are some initial ideas we've had, though not all are usable names – it was just a brainstorm. We're not really happy with any of them. Can you help suggest a catchy name? Leave a comment below or drop us a line.

  • Helping campaigners campaign …
  • BetterBiking
  • CycleStars
  • CityRevolution
  • CyclingSorted
  • CycleTrac
  • CycleTicks
  • Complain.com
  • Cyclocracy
  • Cyclington
  • HelpThem2HelpUs
  • CyclingUpTheAgenda
  • CycleTherapy
  • CycleTraction
  • CycleActive
  • CycleActivist
  • Cyclamity
  • CycleUnison
  • CyclingIntelligence
  • CycleLand
  • PeletonPeople
  • CyclingBestPractice
  • PracticalPeople
  • CycleMyths
  • CycleBugs
  • CycleLeague
  • CycleLeaders
  • RideLeader
  • BikePatch
  • BikeFettling
  • BikePatch
  • Agenda4Change
  • PathRoute
  • RidePatch
  • PatchNetwork
  • PathStreets
  • StreetPatch
  • StreetStrategy
  • Strategy4Streets
  • StreetFocus
  • RouteStrategy
  • RouteToCommute
  • RouteShare
  • StreetLever
  • CrowdedStreets
  • CrowdedOut
  • StreetCrowd
  • StreetVision
  • CycleTool
  • ToolForStreets
  • StreetsAhead
  • FeasibleAndDesirable
  • Note>Log>Act
  • StreetsShared
  • OnRampForCampaigners
  • Vent
  • CyclingSoldiers
  • CycleMission
  • CrowdsourcingCyclingIssues
  • CycleLinks
  • Collaborate

CycleStreets has secured £27,000 of funding as a winner of Geovation – GeoVation is an Ordnance Survey initiative and forms part of the Ideas in Transit project with funding from the Technology Strategy Board and the Department for Transport.

We welcome your feedback, especially to report bugs or give us route feedback.

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