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Gallery: Dutch-quality provision for the Cambridge Local Plan

Photos from the Netherlands and elsewhere indicating the kind of high-quality, cycle-friendly infrastructure that the new developments around Cambridge should have.

Dutch-quality infrastructure can be defined as follows:

i) A network of properly-segregated cycleways that are more convenient than the road, with space properly allocated to enable this. These are not shared with pedestrians; retain priority at junctions (so they are safe and quick); are wide (2-3m wide, usually on both sides of the road); are continuous (i.e. fully joined-up); are properly surfaced with proper foundations. Major roundabouts should have tight geometries and a separate cycle ring.

ii) For minor, residential streets: 20mph speed limit, avoiding long
uninterrupted stretches, home-zone feeling.

iii) Good quality, secure cycle parking – which is above all convenient – is also provided at residential areas and at all destination points.

In other words, the kind of infrastructure that actively encourages new people to cycle rather than use the car, and which existing confident cyclists would not hesitate to use.

This gallery was created on Monday, 30th July 2012

School lunchtime.

Hybrid cycle lane in Groningen

School lunchtime.

Junction on high capacity cycle-paths in Groningen. Lanes for different directions are separated by central reservation, which also helps pedestrians to cross the cycle-path at busy times. These cycle-paths are newer than the Google Maps ... [more]

Cycle path over bridge en route to industrial estate.

New Coton path - excellent width.

Segregated ( "hybrid") cycle lane. It's an old facility and at 2.3 m wide it is narrow. However, this is still enough to be able to pass slower cyclists within the lane. It's not that unusual to see three bikes side by side when kids are ... [more]

Cycle path crossing a road. Cars give way to bikes in both directions.

Possible solution for Gilbert Road in Cambridge. We liked this very much. It had a feel of an on-road path but had clear segregation.

Study tour on Groningerstraat in Assen, a road of similar width to Gilbert Road in Cambridge.

Four metre wide, smooth bidirectional bike path next to large road.

Martin and James on closest modern equivalent to a "hybrid" cycle lane. This is a segregated path with minimal separation from the road. It has separation by grade for most of its distance, becomes separated horizontally at the major junct ... [more]

New properly segregated path replacing older hybrid style provision. Also note that the road is being reduced from three lanes at this point to two.

New not yet completed cycle path replacing older "hybrid" path

Large road junction in Assen, Netherlands. This shows clearly the width of the cycle paths (4 m - wider than road lanes), that they are well spaced from the roads and the way that crossings are direct and do not stop in the middle even when ... [more]

Four metre wide and smooth bidirectional bike path beside a very large road. Note that all cycle crossings of this road are single stage crossings.

Martin and James on closest modern equivalent to a "hybrid" cycle lane. This is a segregated path with minimal separation from the road. It has separation by grade for most of its distance, becomes separated horizontally at the major junct ... [more]

Hybrid cycle lane in Groningen

Hybrid cycle lane in Groningen

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