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Tags: a724

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If through traffic can be sent around Clydeford Road and Bridge Street, and Cambuslang Main Street given over to Summerfest for one day, why not on the other 364 days?

Earnock St has pedestrian access to Burnbank Road, but only away from Hamilton town centre. No provision for cycling.

Space for motoring, but only one bus at the bus stop at a time please! And no-one will want to walk to the bus stop from this direction. Someone did cycle along the dual carriageway just after I'd taken the photo, in all the proper cycling ... [more]

Space for motoring. Even the pedestrian infrastructure is pretty flaky, leading to people walking along the verge.

End of shared footway, start of on-road painted cycle lanes to Cambuslang along the A724.

End of shared footway, start of on-road painted cycle lanes to Cambuslang along the A724.

The toucan crossing across the A724 links route (74) and the ASDA supermarket.

Utility van driver blocks cycleway in preference to parking (legally) on the A724.

Totally inadequate shared footway/cycleway in downtown Blantyre, with toucan crossing in the distance where route (74) crosses the A724 to meet NCN74 in the park.

Route (74) is signed along this fairly ordinary footway.

Route (74) turns right, but the dropped kerb is on the left.

The first sign of a cycle route in Hamilton town centre - a toucan crossing across Brandon Street.

Route (74) goes for an unsignalled crossing of Blantyre Farm Road next to the busy A724 mini-roundabout.

Spot the route sign telling cyclists on route (74) to cross the road.

A recommended route for cyclists, along the A724.

Primary school children are expected to cycle along the A724 with only painted cycle lanes for "protection" on route (74).

The solution to the Whistleberry gap was not to build a ramp to the steps next to the A725, but to sign the existing footway as a cycleway, with no widening at bus stops, just markings.

The solution to the Whistleberry gap was not to build a ramp to the steps next to the A725, but to sign the existing footway as a cycleway, including a couple of toucan crossings across the A724. It has also been signed with (74) signs even ... [more]

A ludicrous arrangement at the bus stop on Main St. Not just the conflict caused by directing cyclists through the bus stop waiting area on the footway, but the raised kerb and drain cover at the start of the cycle lane! See also #89204.

After the bus stop, the cycle lane resumes on the road.

A crazy arrangement for cycling on the footway through the bus stop. And watch out for the kerb when joining the cycle lane ahead - only the left side is dropped. See also #89206.

Cyclists are expected to cycle on the footway past a blind corner and then through the bus stop waiting area.

A busy shared-use footway outside Cambuslang station.

Posts, one of them seemingly just for the hell of it! All three cars were driven through the second red light as well.

The route just ends at the traffic signals before the M74 off-ramp junction, with a Give Way into the Advance Stop Line. It's hard to see any logic as to when cycle facilities are provided here. Westbound it is to cross the off-ramp, with n ... [more]

The toucan crossing call point post is completely obstructing the cycle side of the footway. If a post was put in a motorway lane like this, it would be flattened by someone driving into it.

The toucan crossing signal boxes are positioned so they face away from approaching users.

The start of the M74 junction cycleway on Cambuslang Road.

The M74 junction cycleway starts just after a slight road narrowing, so users will have to take a defensive road position to avoid being run over, in which case they could just continue on the road in such a position.

The cycleway carries along the footway as far as the next junction, then ends.

Toucan crossing call point post in the way of the cycle lane. Clearly the designer isn't interested in providing a useable facility, just tick-boxing.

A very tight turn around the call point post to get into the cycle lane.

The designer of this has obviously been watching too many Danny MacAskill videos! Footway/cycleway crossing M74 off-ramp.

The cycleway on the footway starts just after the first M74 on-ramp junction.

The Territorial Army Centre sign has been moved from the right to the left side of the shared-use footway. The cycle lane on the road leaves the adjacent lane too narrow for the traffic using it. No mention that the 74 route turns left at t ... [more]

I guess it's a cycleway.

South Lanarkshire Council's interpretation of a bus stop bypass, with no continuous footway so all pedestrians expected to walk via the bus stop island. The bus stop itself is in a layby so buses may get delayed waiting to leave.

The cycle lane ends and cyclists directed onto the footway. This sign has (74) rather than the 74 used on other signs nearby. Note also the crayon bike symbol on the carriageway.

South Lanarkshire Council's interpretation of a bus stop bypass, with no continuous footway so all pedestrians expected to walk via the bus stop island. The bus stop itself is in a layby so buses may get delayed waiting to leave.

Access maintained for pedestrians and cyclists during bridge works. Narrow but way better than a lengthy diversion.

The cycle lane can only be accessed by going across the footway, but watch out for the raised kerb at the end. Only the kerb at the footway side is dropped. (See also #88922)

So I think you are meant to just cycle over the footway to get to the cycle lane, but watch that kerb! (See also #88923)

I don't know what the designer thought would happen here.

No real attempt to allow bike access to housing estate via path from main road, and quite narrow cycle lanes for a 40mph road.

Onto the footway at the roundabout at Drumsagard. South Lanarkshire Council has signed the A724 as NCN74, even though the Sustrans NCN74 goes to Uddingston to join NCN75.

Nothing special at these bus stops.

Cyclists Rejoin Carriageway, at right angles!

This traffic island has a cage.

The cycleway around the roundabout at Drumsagard, where the traffic island isn't even big enough for the Give Way triangle!

The cycleway around the roundabout at Drumsagard.

Back onto the footway for the roundabout.

Each of the entrances to Halfway Park has barriers across it and no dropped kerb, making it difficult for people on bikes to visit. Also, another sign for local primary schools, and car parking in the cycle lane.

A door-zone cycle lane past a layby, and if you get hit, there's nowhere for passing motorists to swerve to avoid hitting you.

The stop-start cycle lane starts again under the parked car at the right of the picture.

Continuous cycle lanes past sideroad and traffic island.

Just when the road gets to a narrow bit on a slight climb, the cycle lane stops briefly.

So has the cycle route suddenly gone back onto the road? Without warning (or space) a cycle lane appears in the road, carefully painting around a pothole, and does the straight ahead arrow mean the route is going straight on at the junction ... [more]

A sign for motorists blocking the shared use footway. There is no indication as to what way the cycle route takes at the junction ahead.

While other parts of the country are starting to build bus stop bypasses, South Lanarkshire has come up with this. A triangular area marked as a bus stop, then the cycle lane transfers onto the footway, and the bus stop pole is just beyond ... [more]

Is the designer of this facility designing for triangular cars in the parking bay? Cycle lane in the doorzone.

Just as suddenly as when it started (in #70539) the cycle lane jumps back to the kerbside, just in time for some car parking.

After the bus stop the cycle lane suddenly jumps from the kerbside to the middle of the carriageway, and motorists are just driving in it.

Intermittent cycle lanes and car parking. Plus central hatching showing how much space is available to waste.

Hardly an 8-80 type of environment on NCN74 on the A724. Paint with no consideration for creating space for cycling.

Plenty of room to do something offering a little more protection.

The instruction is clear that the route transfers from the footway to the carriageway at the junction ahead, but drivers are driving their vehicles like the cycle lane beyond the junction isn't there.

Apparently the cycle route has joined the (totally normal looking) footway. Possibly back at the roundabout where there is a dropped kerb.

The cycle route joins the A724, at a signalised roundabout. An Advance Stop Line has been provided, nothing else. From the signs further along the road, it appears cyclists are meant to join the footway at the far side of this junction ( ... [more]

Plenty of roadspace, but clearly this footway has not been widened when it was "converted" to a shared-use foot and cycleway. There's no dropped kerb for cyclists to rejoin the carriageway if they are not turning left into Yews Crescent.

After crossing Glasgow Road, the cycle route goes down another narrow path, with another black-painted barrier. Since there is another barrier between the path and the road, why is the second barrier necessary? However, it would be bette ... [more]

Barriers across the path next to the unsignalised Glasgow Road crossing. Cyclists following the signed route cross and don't actually rejoin the carriageway. The distance of 3 miles to Hamilton is only slightly less than on a sign in ... [more]

Shared-use path alongside A724, part of NCN 74. Footway gets narrower after junction (see #31756).

"Discontinuous National Cycle Route - Rejoin route after 600 yds on Whistleberry Rd" "Cyclists Rejoin Carriageway" No dropped kerb to rejoin carriageway, and no signage for those unfamiliar with the area to get to Whistleberry Road. The ... [more]

No Cycling sign before end of shared-use footway opposite junction on Uddingston to East Kilbride cycle route. (see also #31484) There are also narrow advisory cycle lanes on this section of the A724.

Short length of shared-use footway between junctions on Uddingston to East Kilbride cycle route. The vegetation at side of path eats into the useable space somewhat, as well as restricting sighting of sign facing into bush! (see also #31485 ... [more]

Adding narrow cycle lanes to a busy and fast road does not make it safe to cycle! (50mph limit inter-urban road)

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