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Tags: viafrancigena

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Riverside cycleway, Rome

The traffic-free Ponte Sant'Angelo and the cycleway past the Castel Sant'Angelo, Rome

The main avenue from central Rome to the Vatican is now traffic-free.

The main avenue from central Rome to the Vatican is now traffic-free.

Journey's end on the Via Francigena

End of the segregated cycleway for the Via Francigena to reach the Vatican

Segregated cycleway and lights for the Via Francigena to reach the Vatican

Segregated cycleway and lights for the Via Francigena to reach the Vatican

Segregated cycleway and lights for the Via Francigena to reach the Vatican

Segregated cycleway and lights for the Via Francigena to reach the Vatican

Blue and white marker for the Via Francigena where it leaves the riverside and heads for the Vatican.

Blue and white markers to turn right here on the Via Francigena entering Roma.

Blue and white markers on the Via Francigena entering Roma.

Bumpy but attractive road arriving in the outer suburbs of Rome

No idea why the sign shows cycles as banned here - it's the Via Francigena cycle route.

Tiny blue and white marker - turn left here on the Via Francigena

Not clear - the cyclists' Via Francigena (blue and white) stays on the road to the left, the walker's route goes up steps to the right.

Not clear - the cyclists' Via Francigena (blue and white) stays on the road to the left, the walker's route goes up steps to the right.

Turn right here on the Via Francigena

End of asphalt on the Via Francigena

Tiny blue and white markings where the Via Francigena cycling route turns left to rejoin the walkers' route.

Can you see it? Tiny blue and white marker for the Via Francigena out of Formello.

Returning from the short and rather pointless side-trip to the Santuario del Sorbo, the Via Francigena continues to the left.

Quiet smooth downhill run from Campagnano towards Roma on the Via Francigena

Start of quiet smooth downhill run from Campagnano towards Roma on the Via Francigena

Start of pedestrian area at the southwest end of Campagnano

Steep climb up to Campagnano on the Via Francigena

Route map on the Via Francigena in the Veio regional park

Route signs on the Via Francigena in the Veio regional park

Route signs on the Via Francigena in the Veio regional park (location inexact)

Rough section of the Via Francigena

Route signs on the Via Francigena

Route signs on the Via Francigena

Map of cycle routes in the Parco Valle del Treja

Route signs on the Via Francigena

Turn right here on the Via Francigena

The Roman Via Amerina crossing the Via Francigena

The Roman Via Amerina crossing the Via Francigena

The Via Francigena east of Monterosi

Fork right on the Via Francigena east of Monterosi

End of path used by the Via Francigena alongside the SR2 bypassing Monterosi

Path used by the Via Francigena alongside the SR2 bypassing Monterosi

Start of path used by the Via Francigena alongside a slip road to the SR2 bypassing Monterosi

The Via Francigena uses the footway of a flyover across the SR2 bypassing Monterosi

Market day in Monterosi - but the Via Francigena turns left here in any case.

I was leapfrogging this group of cyclists on the Via Francigena (organised by a company in Firenze) for a surprisingly long time - hares and tortoise.

Terrible surface on the Via Francigena

Fork right here on the Via Francigena to go around the National Golf Club

Turn right here on the Via Francigena to go around the National Golf Club

The Via Francigena south of Sutri

The Via Francigena south of Sutri

The Via Francigena south of Sutri

Path through the Roman necropolis, Sutri - it would be good to take cyclists off the main road to the left, even for a short distance.

Pedestrian zone in central Sutri - motor traffic is diverted to avoid the piazza. I think cycling is allowed.

Big steps down to the bike store at this B&B in Sutri.

Sign for the hikers' Via Francigena - cyclists are meant to go up the hill to the left, but a contraflow would be fine here.

The Via Francigena approaching Capranica through the woods.

The Via Francigena passes under the railway on this not entirely unused road (ie there's a car coming just around the corner).

Tiny blue and white arrow - turn left here on the Via Francigena

Tiny blue and white arrow - turn left here on the Via Francigena

Poor surface on the Via Francigena

Tiny blue and white arrow (at a new bus stop) - turn left here on the Via Francigena

Tiny blue and white arrow - turn right here on the Via Francigena

Tiny blue and white arrow - turn left here on the Via Francigena

An attractive stretch of the Via Francigena, what a shame the surface is so bad.

Tiny blue and white arrow - turn right here on the Via Francigena

Tiny blue and white arrow - turn left here on the Via Francigena

The Via Francigena turns sharp right here to pass beneath the railway

Turn right on the Via Francigena

Appalling road crossing on the Via Francigena, and totally unsigned - cross the main road, turn left then either come through this gap and turn sharp right, or go to the far end of the barrier and come back.

Appalling road crossing on the Via Francigena, and totally unsigned - come down the road in the background, turn left then either come through this gap and turn sharp right, or go to the far end of the barrier and come back.

The roads of Viterbo have a lot of traffic and are in terrible condition.

The gravel track of the Via Francigena passes under the Viterbo bypass and hits asphalt and traffic.

Approaching Viterbo on the Via Francigena

Barrier on the Via Francigena - the route actually turns left just before.

Barrier on the Via Francigena - the route actually turns left just before.

Straight ahead on the Via Francigena.

Fork right on the Via Francigena (there's a small sign).

Pilgrims on the Via Francigena

The Via Francigena goes left and right under the railway - onto a much worse surface than the Roman road.

The Via Francigena follows an actual Roman road for quite a few hundred metres.

The Via Francigena follows an actual Roman road for quite a few hundred metres.

The Via Francigena follows an actual Roman road for quite a few hundred metres.

The Via Francigena follows an actual Roman road for quite a few hundred metres.

Cyclists should follow the blue and white markers for the Via Francigena - straight on here.

Rough section of the Via Francigena out of Montefiascone.

Cyclists should follow the blue and white markers for the Via Francigena - to the left here.

The Via Francigena leaving Montefiascone

Cycling group at the cathedral of Montefiascone

Bike shop, Montefiascone

This looks like a pop-up Covid-19 road closure arriving in Montefiascone - no exemption for cyclists.

The Via Francigena forks left here off the main road to Montefiascone

Crossing where the Via Francigena forks left off the main road to Montefiascone

The Via Francigena reaches asphalt on the edge of Bolsena

Water point on the Via Francigena

Rough stretch of track on the Via Francigena

Turn left here on the Via Francigena cycle route (or carry on ahead to follow EuroVelo5 and turn left on the main road).

The Via Francigena continues straight ahead past this quarry access.

Cyclists following the Via Francigena should turn left here (can you see the tiny blue and white marker?).

Modal filter on the Via Francigena, but cyclists should stick to the road to the right.

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