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Showing items 301 to 400 from total of 167,998 items. Ordered by photo # descending.

Photo # Icon Photo Caption Categorisation
174770Photo #174770Shared use on Europa Way, Ipswich.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174769Photo #174769Busy roundabout, Ipswich.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
174768Photo #174768Shared use footway on Sproughton Road, Ipswich.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174767Photo #174767Footpath, no cycling but looks like useful shortcut.Track:
Infrastructure
track
174766Photo #174766Shared use link through an industrial area, Ipswich.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174765Photo #174765River path, IpswichCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174764Photo #174764River path, IpswichGeneral sign/notice:
Infrastructure
signs
174763Photo #174763River path, IpswichCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174762Photo #174762NCN51 alongside West End Road, IpswichCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174761Photo #174761Sir Bobby Robson bridge. He was an English footballer and football manager, see en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_RobsonCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174760Photo #174760River pathCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174759Photo #174759Sculpture by the river path.Destination:
Good practice
destinations
174758Photo #174758River pathCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
174757Photo #174757Info board by the River Orwell.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
174756Photo #174756[Route ridden/data captured 8.10.21] York. This is the official, signed, diversion route during the Clementhorpe flood works. It is around 2km long. Typical ride time: around 10m but the junctions mean it could be longer. The route is twisty, with right turns, and includes summits you can't see over the top of, streets with no sight lines and that are lined with motor vehicles such that you are at risk (or need to be alert to the risk) of car dooring. On many of the roads there is no space to pull over if there is an oncoming motor vehicle or a driver who is determined to pass. At the Skeldergate/Fetter Lane end it starts with a right turn and a steep uphill from a standstill (see: #174411). There is no seating. No place to catch your breath or rest after tackling one of the uphill stretches or if you simply want or need to sit. I do not know of any free toilets or quick and easy toilet access on this route. In short, the route has none of the attributes of the original - see #174754. It may meet the statutory requirements for a route but it is in no way comparable to the original. Many, many people do not feel it is safe or find it difficult to use - and so don't - for other reasons including the steep ups and downs. The graphic shows how convoluted the route is and how often the gradient changes. The pedestrian (presumably also the wheelchair/mobility scooter) route is along the much more direct but heavily trafficked Bishopthorpe Road: #174755.Other:
Problem
general
174755Photo #174755[Route ridden/data captured 8.10.21] Bishopthorpe Road, York. 'Bishy Road' is the route that runs parallel to and close to Terry Ave/Avenue. Terry Ave floods sometimes so an accessible, inclusive, alternative is needed. However, CYC chose not to rework Bishy Road as an alternative to Terry Ave for the duration of the floodworks which would have given the city's residents and visitors a sustainable alternative in perpetuity (legacy). It developed a diversion route (see: #174756) that is none of the things the original is (see: #174754). Using Bishy Road, the alternative to Terry Ave between Fetter Lane/Skeldergate and the Millennium Bridge is around 1.5km long. Typical ride time: 5m 45s. The graphic shows it's pretty flat. What it can't show is that the route is heavily trafficked with parked vehicles (risk of dooring) and often impatient and aggressive drivers including at pinchpoints.Road environment:
Problem
road
174754Photo #174754[Route ridden/data captured 8.10.21] Original route of 'Terry Avenue', York. A continuous, mostly motor traffic-free riverside route between Skeldergate and the Millennium Bridge, York. No ups and downs, no junctions of note. It closed for a year on Monday, 17 May 2021 for Clementhorpe floodworks. The route is around 1.5km long between Skeldergate and the Millennium Bridge. Typical ride time: 4m 30s. The graphic shows the route is flat. Compare this with 'Bishy Road see: #174755 and the signed diversion: #174756.

On 21 September 2021 I submitted a FoI request:

"Please see below the response to your enquiry under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).


· Request point 1 - Who at CYC signed off the Terry Avenue diversion i.e. who had the ultimate responsibility?

Response – The detail of the diversion routes for pedestrians and cyclists was required to have been submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority, in consultation with the Chair and Vice Chair of the Planning Committee by planning approval 19/00570/FUL, Condition 23.

This condition was discharged under planning reference AOD/20/00269, with the diversion routes submitted by the applicant, reviewed by the Highway Authority (involving the Highway Development Control Engineer, the Traffic and Highway Development Manager and the Head of Transport) and the Planning Authority. As per the planning condition, the diversion routes were approved by the Planning Authority in consultation with the Chair and Vice Chair of the Planning Committee. The relevant documents and decisions are available on the planning portal at this link: www.york.gov.uk/SearchPlanningApplications.



· Request point 2 - Please list the criteria the diversion had to meet

Response – The routes are diversion routes for a closure associated with road/street works, in this case works undertaken by the environment Agency in the adopted highway. The site set up, including diversion routes, therefore has to be compliant with the “Safety at Street Works and Road Works - A Code of Practice” document, known as the Red Book, which is available here: assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/321056/safety-at-streetworks.pdf

The Red Book requires that “a risk assessment must be carried out on any diversion route to ensure it is suitable and safe for the diverted traffic or pedestrians”. This was undertaken through the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Road Safety Audits which are available on the planning portal under planning reference AOD/20/00269.


· Request point 3 - For each of those points in 2, please tell me how well CYC considers the Terry Avenue diversion, agreed on and implemented, meets them

Response – The pedestrian and cycle diversion routes accepted under AOD/20/00269 are considered to meet the requirements of the Red Book.



· Request point 4 - Please tell me the extent to which CYC considers the Terry Avenue diversion agreed on and implemented:

o a) is safe at night/in the dark/in bad weather for all cyclists;

o b) is comfortable and safe in very hot weather for all cyclists;

o c) offers seating and resting areas along its length in recognition of the steep hills;

o d) offers places people can stop and chat with people they know/and don't;

o e) offers opportunities for people to get into conversation with people they don't know;

o f) can be used by people with a learning difficulty/disability.

Response – City of York Council does not hold this data. The pedestrian and cycle diversion routes accepted under AOD/20/00269 are considered to meet the requirements of the Red Book.



· Request point 5 - Please tell me what is the youngest age the diversion is considered to be ridable by someone cycling on their own in bad weather which limits visibility at the time of year the nights are longest and the days shortest.

Response - City of York Council does not hold this data. The pedestrian and cycle diversion routes accepted under AOD/20/00269 are considered to meet the requirements of the Red Book."

The route (I refer to the whole stretch as 'Terry Ave') is level, flat and linear/continuous. It can be ridden in hot weather as the actual Terry Avenue stretch is lined by trees; in windy and wet weather, as it is mostly motor traffic-free; can be ridden safely in the dark as it is well lit, very well used and is mostly motor traffic-free; can be ridden in snow - if it is not icy - as it is mostly motor traffic-free; is logical, so can be used by many people with learning difficulties or with other cognitive disabilities; could be ridden safely (in my view) by a 10 year old on their own after a couple of trips with an adult; can be ridden if you are feeling under the weather, vulnerable (pregnant or following bad news) or tired but still want to get out; by people who suffer when exposed to air pollution/particles caused by motor vehicles. It can be enjoyed by slower, more cautious, less confident riders or visitors, or people with children or adults they care for on their cycles, by older people including care home residents under the Cycling Without Age programme (yorkbikebelles.community/events/cyclingwithoutage/), by children learning to balance bike or progressing to cycles with pedals. It can be ridden sociably - side by side - and you are able to talk as you cycle as it is safe, wide and there is no motor traffic-noise. If you meet someone you know who is walking - you can walk companionably talking as you go. If you meet an acquaintance you can stop and talk - there's space to do so and it's quiet. The space and the variety of users lead to conversations with people you don't know. It builds communities.
Road environment:
Event
road
174751Photo #174751[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] Circe recumbent tandem. Other images this cycle today: #174749 and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174750Photo #174750[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] The length and width of the parking space a Circe recumbent tandem requires: W 85cm, L 220cm. Other images this cycle here today: #174749 and links. Other images today #174742 for context and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174749Photo #174749[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] There is space at this supermarket to roll in and park a longer machine – a Circe recumbent tandem (www.circecycles.com/products/morpheus/) with ease. See this cycle with chalked measurements: #174750, #174751. This is an example of what I call a ‘York’cycle: a machine adapted or bespoke to be used for utility or caring purposes. Other image likely of the same cycle but with a trailer: #173325. Other images today #174742 for context and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174748Photo #174748[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] Context and links: #174747.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174747Photo #174747[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] 'York'cycles on the Sheffields at this supermarket today - machines designed or adapted for utility or caring purposes use. Other image of this today (with the measurements of the space required for the recumbent tandem) #174748. Other images today #174742 and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174746Photo #174746[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] See #174742 for context and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174745Photo #174745[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] See #174742 for context and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174744Photo #174744[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] See #174742 for context and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174743Photo #174743[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] See #174742 for context and links.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174742Photo #174742[Image taken 10.10.21] Lidl, James Street, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] Image taken to show woman parking a cycle outside a supermarket with a bag on her back and panniers - so she needs space to load/unload move her and her cycle. Image also shows a (white) Circe recumbent tandem and other 'York'cycles ie longer, wider, bespoke or adorned/adapted cycles used for utility or caring purposes. The racks here are the Sheffield variety and are 100cm (approx) apart - the minimum realistic width apart. But they are under cover and the access to them is not blocked by car parking spaces as is the case at other supermarkets in York. You can usually cycle into the racks here. They also have enough space for longer machines such as the Circe visible here or a cycle with a trailer and for people with most lengths of cycle (incl with a trailer) to be able to manoeuvre their machine in/out without fear of hitting a motor vehicle parked behind or passing. The parking is not perfect as the racks are so far from the trolleys - the trolley bay is the other side of the entrance. Plus the slope is so steep that cycles roll and trolleys roll away into the car park. Other images here taken for the same reason: #174743, #174744, #174745, #174746. Other images today: #174747, #174748, #174749, #174750, #174751, #174754, #174755, #174756.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174741Photo #174741Stadt hat gute Radständer anstelle von 2 KFZ Parkplätzen installiertCycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174740Photo #174740Neu gebaute Kreisstraße wurde 1,5 m breiter als bisherige Straße. Was zum Rasen einlädt. Radweg wurde vergessen!Road environment:
Problem
road
174739Photo #17473910 neue Fahrradständer am Eingang Rathaus. Sehr gute Bügel.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174738Photo #174738Sehr gute neue Fahrradständer am Rathaus Eingang StadtbüchereiCycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
174737Photo #174737North approach to underpass and NMR beginning to look reasonably well advanced.Other:
Infrastructure
general
174736Photo #174736The north compound is beginning to look quite tidy and well-advanced.Other:
Infrastructure
general
174735Photo #174735I guess that this (alongside the Marleigh haul road) is the new connection to Newmarket Road for the Jubilee path, bypassing the P&R site.Other:
Infrastructure
general
174734Photo #174734I guess that this (alongside the Marleigh haul road) is the new connection to Newmarket Road for the Jubilee path, bypassing the P&R site.Other:
Infrastructure
general
174733Photo #174733I guess that this (alongside the Marleigh haul road) is the new connection to Newmarket Road for the Jubilee path, bypassing the P&R site.Other:
Infrastructure
general
174732Photo #174732Mountain bike and hiking route markers, CabreretsRoute sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
174731Photo #174731No mopeds or motorbikes on the path to Cabrerets from the Pech-Merle cave - mountain-biking is allowed but not exactly straightforward.General sign/notice:
Infrastructure
signs
174730Photo #174730Mountain bike route markerRoute sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
174729Photo #174729Modal filters in RocamadourCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174728Photo #174728Cycle parking at the convenient end of the Rocamadour car parkCycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
174727Photo #174727Cycle parking (also in the distance) at the convenient end of the Rocamadour car parkCycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
174726Photo #174726Sign to two-wheeler parking at Rocamadour - more for motorbikes than cycles, I suspect.Route sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
174725Photo #174725The traffic is back on Mill Road :(Congestion:
Problem
congestion
174724Photo #174724A tempting route but a dead-end - cyclists need to go through the village of Mercues to the right.Other:
Infrastructure
general
174723Photo #174723Cycle route V86 follows the river from the left/south, turns inland then heads to the right through the vineyards.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174722Photo #174722Modal filter, CahorsCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
174721Photo #174721Traffic-free road in the old town of CahorsCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
174720Photo #174720Road closure and modal filter, CahorsRoad environment:
Infrastructure
road
174719Photo #174719A huge square over an underground car park (and a Roman amphitheatre), with a few inadequate cycle stands.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
174718Photo #174718Riverside route, CahorsCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174717Photo #174717Riverside route, CahorsCycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174716Photo #174716[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, junction with Foss Islands Road, York. New signage top left in the image. Context and links: #174712. Pre-works images: #174548, #167788. During works images: #174583, #174584. Other images today: #174706 and linksGeneral sign/notice:
Infrastructure
signs
174715Photo #174715[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, York. Context and links: #174712.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
174714Photo #174714[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, York. ‘Light segregation’ ie armadillos and wands. With a width of 158cm this meets current (LTN 1/20 www.gov.uk/government/publications/cycle-infrastructure-design-ltn-120) minimum standards. Context and links: #174712. Other 'width' measured today: #174711.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
174713Photo #174713[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, York. Looking towards Hungate (#174579). On the first day the new configuration opened (one way the other way for motor traffic, two-way for cycles) many many drivers did not understand the limit of/which properties were included in the 'access only' signs at the start of Navigation Road (behind the position this image was taken). Only two in the hour I was here did not turn round and go back the way they came. One driver tried to enter but did reverse when faced with an oncoming driver who did not back down. The two drivers that went through did so at high speed. But satnavs will catch up and local people will get the hang of it. I am concerned about the presumably unforeseen effect on cyclists continuing from here/coming out of Hungate and riding towards Foss Islands (and back) see my updated caption for #174553. This scheme context and links: #174712.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
174712Photo #174712[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, York. The works (see: #174548) have ended. This short stretch (looking away from Hungate) is one way for all traffic and two way for people on cycles. The aim was to prevent rat running. But the changes may have increased the hazards and scope for intimidation of cyclists - see updated caption: #174553 and have not tackled the access issues for cyclists turning into Navigation Road from Foss Islands Way (see updated caption: #174554). Other images here today see: #174713, #174714, #174715, #174716. Other images today see: #174706 and links.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
174711Photo #174711[Image taken 8.10.21] Cygnet Street, York. The gaps need to be 150cm to meet current standards. The arrangement on the left is an example of the (shameful) York barriers. One council officer refers to these as “ankle breakers”. They are also ‘pannier wreckers’ but more seriously ‘freedom limiters’ or for some people simply ‘insurmountable barriers’ that limit or prevent an individual from moving around the city’s network independently, spontaneously… (See also: #173450. ) Other width images today see: #174714, #174715 and links.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
174710Photo #174710[UPDATE: 9.10.21. The contractors retrieved the sign and put it back into position.] [Image taken 8.10.21] West Esplanade, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location.] Another useless sign. This one is for wheelchair users on the diversion for the Scarborough Bridge to Ouse Bridge Flood Scheme. If it is not removed (I will report it) when the river rises again it will become a waterborne hazard and, each time it stops, a landbased hazard and an eyesore. Other images today: #174706 and links.Other:
Problem
general
174709Photo #174709[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, York. A family in a Nihola (www.nihola.com/home.html) - an example of what I call a ‘York’cycle. See also: #174706 and links.Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
174708Photo #174708[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, York. I’ve seen one of these two people a couple of times. He (as they, today) moves fast and never seems to have time or inclination to stop. A shame as perhaps he has a business he could promote, but also because that’s a key aspect of cycle usage in cities – you can stop, talk, create communities… The setups of their cycles fit my description of a ‘York’cycle. See also: #174706, and links.Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
174706Photo #174706[Image taken 8.10.21] Navigation Road, York. The rider has a car but prefers to make journeys by cycle – in all weathers. This is what I call a ‘York’cycle. A machine set up for utility and/or caring duties. Such cycles can be heavy and wide and the infra needs to accommodate them. That’s cycle paths, cycle parking and, as this cyclist alerted me to, where you get on and get off. Despite the open frame, this cyclist mounts and dismounts with a leg backwards over the saddle not between the handlebar stem and the saddle. Providing wider lanes and larger gaps between cycle racks makes the provision more accessible, more inclusive and more sustainable as it doesn’t limit access or use to certain users. Other ‘York’cycle images today: #174708, #174709. Other images today: #174710, #174711, #174712, #174713, #174714, #174715, #174716Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
174705Photo #174705Good advice on road positioning at junctions from Cycling UK.

www.cyclinguk.org/road-position

Shot in this part of Guildford.

twitter.com/wearecyclinguk/status/1446385167090790466
Other:
Good practice
general
174704Photo #174704Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
174703Photo #174703Why on earth construct a hump for cyclists to ride though the bus stop then merge with the virtually traffic free busway immediately afterwards - rather than simply join the busway just before?Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174702Photo #174702Narrow 2-way bollarded cycle lane - with right angle turn.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174701Photo #174701Absurdly narrow 2-way bollarded cycle lane gives way at a side roadCycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174700Photo #174700Absurdly narrow 2-way cycleway.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174699Photo #174699This very narrow convoluted cycle lane is actually intended for 2-way use!Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174698Photo #174698Covid lane has been made permanent. Unfortunately, so has the daft priority marking.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174697Photo #174697COVID popup lane now made permanent - complete with the daft priority reversal.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174696Photo #174696Covid cycleway in Runcorn now made permanent. The bollards still obstruct the entrance, but you can at least get into it now.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
174695Photo #174695The new bus gate on Scotland Road is welcome - shame about the priority on the exit.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
174694Photo #174694Scotland Road bus gateRoad environment:
Good practice
road
174693Photo #174693New bus gate on Scotland RoadRoad environment:
Good practice
road
174692Photo #174692New "high quality" cycle route crosses the two lane entry for Brian Bevan Island. No priority. No protection.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174691Photo #174691Shared use pavement goes through a bus shelter. (A "High quality cycle route" according to Warrington Council.) I thought they were not supposed to install this sort of rubbish any more. Not only that, but the dangerous half-width cycle lane has been left on the carriageway giving cyclists the worst of both worlds.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
174690Photo #174690Bucolic delights in abundance along ncn1 as it descends Achany Glen towards the Kyle of Sutherland and Dornoch Firth.Other:
Infrastructure
general
174689Photo #174689This scar will never heal!” - west flank opening, 1972 (from ‘The Glasgow Herald Book of Glasgow’) t.co/nARiXLdKUPRoad environment:
Event
road
174688Photo #174688Distance measuring wheel.Other:
Good practice
general
174687Photo #174687Flowers near crash site, see #174673.Road environment:
Event
road
174686Photo #174686Flowers near crash site, see #174673.Road environment:
Event
road
174685Photo #174685Old machinery at the side of the High Peak TrailOther:
Infrastructure
general
174684Photo #174684Looking back down the incline up to Middleton TopOther:
Infrastructure
general
174683Photo #174683Junction of High Peak Trail and branch to CarsingtonOther:
Infrastructure
general
174682Photo #174682High Peak Trail, view of embankmentOther:
Infrastructure
general
174681Photo #174681Junction of High Peak Trail and Green LaneOther:
Infrastructure
general
174680Photo #174680Other:
Infrastructure
general
174679Photo #174679A common sight in Cambridge’s Romsey streets - pedestrians using the middle of the road.Road environment:
Problem
road
174678Photo #174678Who the fuck came up with these bike racks? t.co/KIbowqzQ5gCycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
174677Photo #174677Professional cyclist Alexandar Richardson claims to have been attacked by a machete-wielding motorcycle gang inside Richmond Park earlier today. His bicycle was then stolen by the gang.

twitter.com/ldnparks/status/1446170433749934080
Road environment:
Event
road
174676Photo #174676Panorama shot of Hills Road from the junction with the north side of Queen Edith's Way.Road environment:
Infrastructure
road
174675Photo #174675This is the spot where the painted cycleway stops on the approach to the junction of Hills Road with Brooklands Avenue.Road environment:
Problem
road
174673Photo #174673Site of a fatal collision between a lorry and a cyclist. See #174665.Roadworks:
Event
roadworks
174672Photo #174672Site of a fatal collision between a lorry and a cyclist. See #174673.Roadworks:
Event
roadworks
174671Photo #174671Signs warning pedestrians to divert because of road works around the corner at this busy roundabout near Addenbrooke's Hospital.Roadworks:
Event
roadworks
174670Photo #174670@miketwalton @RapidDevon @DianaFMoore @GreenAmyExeter @Luke_Sills Pretty sure Cowick Hill is worse t.co/gp4GHaB1h9Other:
Infrastructure
general
174669Photo #174669[UPDATE: On the afternoon of 9.10.21 these had gone.] [Image taken 7.10.21] Crichton Avenue, junction with Burton Stone Lane, York. The red boxes frame two signs that are not in situ. The one at the back I picked up out of the ped-cycle-wheelchair route on Sunday. I will pick up and move the second one. This is part of the named Orbital route (see: #173658). This is a key link for school children as well as adults. The signs are no more use than flytipping if left like this and they are hazards and eyesores. I have been told that the relevant organisation (in this case CYC) is supposed to check signage is safe and in place regularly. They are part of the Gillygate diversion: yorkmix.com/key-york-city-centre-road-now-closed-for-two-weeks/. See also: #174661 and links.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
174668Photo #174668[UPDATE: On the afternoon of 9.10.21 these had gone.] [Image taken 7.10.21] Burton Stone Lane, York. The red frame shows the existence and location of one or more signs not in situ, not doing their jobs. Therefore they are hazards and eyesores. See also: #174661 and links.Other:
Problem
general
174667Photo #174667[UPDATE: On the afternoon of 9.10.21 this had gone.] [Image taken 7.10.21] Burton Stone Lane, York. Fallen sign. See also: #174661 and links.Other:
Problem
general

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