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benbecula

Photos

Showing items 1 to 23 from total of 23 items. Ordered by location # descending.

Location # Icon Video Photo Caption Categorisation
17087Photo #17087Chains have been added to the posts that separate the bike racks from the nearest motor vehicle parking space.
(See also #16540, #16559, #16541.) I arrived as the owners of the two bikes shown in the background were struggling to secure them to the railings of the trolley park. I asked them if they were using that area because they preferred it or because they did not know there was cycle parking. The latter reason was true. They followed me to the racks and had secured their bikes in no time. There are many reasons people don't use cycle parking provided. Sometimes, as here, it is because racks are provided but not signposted and not visible.
Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
16560Photo #16560Compare the bike parking at the B&Q (very close to the store, right next to the trolley park, covered) with what the landlord at the Peckham B&Q thought B& Q customers would use #16559. See what 22 months of campaigning resulted in at that store #16539, #16540 and #16541.Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
16559Photo #16559This is the cycle parking outside Halfords (which has a Bike Hut) that the landlord of the site suggested would suffice for customers of B&Q despite that store being at the other end of the park). See also #16539, #16540, #16541 and #17087. Compare this scenario with #16560.Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
16558Photo #16558This shot shows how short is the gap from the segregated bike lane into the carriageway. (See also #16556 and #16557.)Road environment:
Event
road
16557Photo #16557This shot shows that there is no room for a motor vehicle and a cyclist who has exited the segregated bike lane to be able to pass safely. (See also #16556 and #16558.)Road environment:
Event
road
16556Photo #16556There are no signs to warn cyclists that the segregated bike lane ends suddenly. The lane goes round a corner so you can't see the blockage before you enter into it.
To be able to continue your journey northbound you need to pull into the remaining carriageway. When the lights change there is a constant and relatively fast moving flow of motor vehicles here including artics.
The position of the cyclist shows how narrow the remaining carriageway is. The image was taken on a Saturday - 11.4.09 - so there were gaps in the traffic that enabled me to take this shot. (See also #16557 and #16558.)
Road environment:
Event
road
16553Photo #16553This image (taken 11.4.09) shows:
a) the changes to the layout of the northbound carriageways, and
b) the reduction in the bike lane
of Blackfriars Bridge.
Weekdays this bridge is busy. It is well used by cyclists. However there are no signs on the approach warning cyclists that the bike lane has been radically reduced in width.
(See also #16545, #16546 and #16547.)
Road environment:
Event
road
16547Photo #16547This shot was taken on Blackfriars Bridge (northbound) on the evening of Good Friday (April 10) 2009 - just two days after a cyclist was killed by an HGV at the Elephant and Castle, approx 2km from here.
There are no signs alerting cyclists to the change in layout. (See also #16553, #16545 and #16546.)
Just over the bridge the segregated bike lane comes to a halt when it is blocked by roadworks. Again there is no warning to cyclists and as the road curves here you cannot see the problem before you get to it.
If you know there is a blockage and you ride in the carriageway with the rest of the traffic you risk being intimidated by other road users who do not know why the bike route is unattractive and who do not respect the cyclist's right to choose what s/he feels is the safest place on the road.
Road environment:
Event
road
16546Photo #16546(See also #16545 and #16547.)

Presumably due to works taking place at the northern end of Blackfriars Bridge northbound #16553, the road layout has been reworked. The bike lane has been reduced from around 90 inches to 43 inches and at its narrowest to 30 inches.
In my view this is putting cyclists' lives at risk. The lane is too narrow and should be removed for the duration of the works.
Road environment:
Event
road
16545Photo #16545After a cyclist was killed in 2004 on Blackfriars Bridge, the layout was rejigged (read the history of it all here: 209.85.229.132/search)
and cyclists gained a fantastically wide lane all to themselves.
On 10.4.09 I was cycling across the bridge and discovered the width of the bike lane had been halved (see #16553) and it was no longer a mandatory lane but advisory. There were no warning signs alerting cyclists to the changes. If you think from the photo that this is okay see the effect of introducing an HGV (see #16546) and then put a cyclist alongside one (see #16547).
Road environment:
Event
road
16541Photo #16541This image shows how far the bike racks at B & Q are from the entrance to the store. (Compare this scenario with that in Cambridge #16560.) They are 'beyond' the entrance in the sense that to cycle to them you would need to go through the car park - not a nice proposition. Plus there is no sign alerting people to their existence or pointing to them so I wonder how many people will see them. Further, if you are buying large or heavy items and you need a trolley, because the racks are so far from the entrance and the trolley park - you can't use those shown in the image, the ones to use are on the far side of the entrance - you have to leave your shopping and/or bags unattended at your bike while you return the trolley. I can't load up my bike while locked as I have to carry the locks in my pannier so I had to leave all items and my pannier on the ground next to my (locked) bike. By chance, I was here at a very quiet time so I had a clear view of my bike, pannier and purchases most of the time, however I did still worry that I might have seen the last of them. When busy, this area will be crowded and there will be no line of sight. It is an impractical and, I feel dangerous (because cyclists will need to walk such a distance and several times among moving vehicles in what is very limited space when the store is busy), place to locate the racks. (See also #16539, #16540, #16559 and #17087.)Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
16540Photo #16540I was pleased to see that spaces between the uprights in the long-campaigned for racks at B&Q (see also #16541, #16539, #16559 and #17087) are quite far apart. I was able to get into the space and load up my bike. It would be tighter if there were another bike on the next upright but I'm not complaining about this aspect at least.Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
16539Photo #16539Since 19 June 2006 I've been lobbying B & Q and the managing agents of the site to get cycle parking put in outside B&Q. There's a clear need - there was always at least one other bike, usually several, attached to the railings surrounding the trolley area. Today, 9 April 09, a nice surprise - cycle parking! There are two lots of 'toast racks' - one with 3 uprights, accommodating 6 bikes, one with 2, accommodating 4 bikes. However, had I approached from the road entrance I wouldn't have seen the racks. There are no signs and they are a long way from the entrance. It's not all bad news though. The image shows the existence of posts which are presumably intended to protect the bikes from motor vehicles while they are being parked or making some other manoeuvre next to the racks. (See also #16540, #16541, #16559 and #17087.)Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
15592Photo #15592There's lots of cycle parking at the Asda in Stevenage. But the car parking is right in front of it and no gaps have been left for cyclists to get to/from the racks. The only time you can easily get to the store with your empty panniers and back from it with a trolley is if there is a spare car parking space as shown. See also #15590 and #15591.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
15591Photo #15591The Asda in Stevenage is right on the cycle network and there's lots of cycle parking. But when all the car parking spaces in front of the racks are full the only way to get your shopping to your bike is to lift it over the bars. Then there's the problem of how you get to your bike. See also #15590 and #15592.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
15590Photo #15590You can get to the Asda in Stevenage by bike - it's right on the cycle network. And there's lots of cycle parking. But no-one thought how cyclists would get from the cycle parking to the store or how they would get their shopping to their bikes so no spaces were left between the car spaces. See also #15591 and #15592.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
15319Photo #15319St Mary's Churchyard, which re-opened in May 2008, is the first part of the regeneration of the Elephant and Castle. An underused green space was landscaped, a children's playground was put in and three cycle racks were installed (see #14036). Local cyclists called them "cricket stumps" saying they were not fit for purpose. (They did not enable both wheels to be locked to the rack or support a bike. Additionally they had been installed in a line rather than parallel, which further reduced their usefulness.) After complaints from the local cycling campaign - Southwark Cyclists - www.southwarkcyclists.org.uk the original racks were removed and replaced by these four smart Sheffields in early November 2008.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
15317Photo #15317On some City roads, cyclists make up 27% of the traffic at peak commuting times. Cycle parking in the Square Mile is in terribly short supply despite new racks being added in 2008. Most of the buildings in Austin Friars have railings round them. However, the railings have signs warning that bikes attached to them will be removed. The shortage of cycle parking has got so bad in the past few months (autumn 08) that people are now 'stacking' them on the one set of railings without notices. The owners of the top bikes must be much taller than me.Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
14488Photo #14488Cycle hoop.

Anthony is a trainee architect who is also a cyclist. And a cyclist who has had a bike stolen by thieves who lifted it off the top of the pole he had 'secured' it to.
Anthony has subsequently designed the Cyclehoop www.cyclehoop.com/

See #14487.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
14487Photo #14487Cyclehoops are designed to be installed on street furniture. Designer Anthony Lau says this reduces street clutter by using existing structures rather than adding more and makes installing them fast - Anthony says he can put in 20 in a day.

See #14488 for a picture of the hoop in use.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
12385Photo #12385Same facility, different view.
Worried about that bent rack though. Can this be prevented? Perhaps by putting in planters? But planners don't like these because people use them as litter bins...
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
12384Photo #12384One car space or four bike stands. Would work on Bateman Street or in Romsey town.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
10857Photo #10857Practical use of a Gormley:
www.bbc.co.uk/london/content/articles/2007/05/03/gormley_london_figures_feature.shtml
Bicycle:
Event
bicycles

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