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davidhembrow

Photos

Showing items 1 to 100 from total of 617 items. Ordered by location # descending.

Location # Icon Video Photo Caption Categorisation
35502Photo #35502As many people are skating today as cycling. Photo shows the correct height for a windscreen to protect children from weather.Other:
Misc
general
34718Photo #34718Junction on high capacity cycle-paths. The speed bumps are to slow down moped riders who are also allowed to use these paths. The central reservation helps pedestrians to cross this busy cycle-path at peak times.

Google maps imagery does not yet show this cycle-path as it exists now.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
34715Photo #34715Junction on high capacity cycle-paths in Groningen. Lanes for different directions are separated by central reservation, which also helps pedestrians to cross the cycle-path at busy times.

These cycle-paths are newer than the Google Maps imagery.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
33335Photo #33335Resurfacing a cyclepath, Dutch style.

This four kilometre long, four metre wide cycle path is being resurfaced. There's room for two rollers next to each other.

The sign reads "Fietspad - dus niet brommen". i.e. "Cyclepath - therefore no mopeds".

However, while this is only for bikes, it's still built to the same standard as a road. After all, in the winter the same snow ploughs as go along the roads are used to clear this cycle path. Also vehicles need access to clear the weeds from the ditch, mow the grass etc.
Roadworks:
Good practice
roadworks
33334Photo #33334Resurfacing a cycle path, Dutch style. Another layer is applied to a four kilometre long four metre wide cyclepath.Roadworks:
Good practice
roadworks
33320Photo #33320Resurfacing of a cycle path. This path is 4 m wide and four kilometres long without interruption, providing part of a fast cycle route around Assen. The new surface is several inches of asphalt laid on top of proper foundations. The same machines are used to do this as would be used on a road.

It's now much improved since the 2008 study tour which visited this location, though it was actually very impressive then too ( #11713 )

A video of riding along the path before the final layer was put on can be seen here:
www.youtube.com/watch
Roadworks:
Good practice
roadworks
32991Photo #32991Great news! The last of the "hybrid" provision in Groningen is going away, to be replaced by proper cycle paths with more obvious distinction between the road and the cyclepath.

The Northbound side of the road has already been done. The Southbound side will follow soon.

Continual improvement is the norm in the Netherlands. Frankly, it's surprising that that last few hundred metres of old style cycle path survived as long as it did.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
32236Photo #32236While bidirectional cyclepaths in this part are normally 4 m wide, they can be much wider at junctions.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
32235Photo #32235Sometimes there can be terrible obstructions for cyclists on Dutch streets.

This is one of the main streets through Assen.
Obstruction:
Good practice
obstructions
31563Photo #31563One of the reasons why cyclists shouldn't be too worried about trees being removed to create cycle paths is illustrated very well by this cycle path going through a wooded scene in the Netherlands.

Trees grow back.

This photo was taken in Flevoland. The world's largest artificial island. This was sea-bed just 50 years ago. None of the trees or other plants that you see in this photo existed back then. It took many years for the soil be desalinated enough to get to the point where vegetation like this was possible, so none of these trees are as old as fifty years. Nevertheless, Flevoland now has huge wooded areas, complete with rather wonderful cycle paths which go through them.

You can see more of this cycle-path in a video on youtube: www.youtube.com/watch
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
30891Photo #30891Bicycle Road (fietsstraat) in Assen. Cyclists are all on one side of the canal while drivers use the other side. This side is a through road only if you ride a bike, and provides part of a direct and very nearly completely car free route from a new suburb on the west of the city to the city centre.

The original trees on the right of this bicycle road were removed in 2007. This had to be done when the canal was moved sideways by two metres to narrow this side but widen the other side. The reason for this is to provide enough space on the south side of the canal for a wide cycle path in addition to the road for cars.

It is of no consequence to remove trees and replace them. Trees grow quickly, and when large trees are planted in the first place, an originally tree-lined route very quickly recovers. The trees on the right of the bicycle road now were planted in 2008 and already, just three years later, provide good cover. See #13318 for how they looked immediately after planting.

This photo was taken on a 2011 study tour in Assen:
hembrow.blogspot.com/2011/05/assen-study-tour-with-australian.html
hembrow.eu/studytour
Road environment:
Good practice
road
30889Photo #30889This access road to a new development in Houten in the Netherlands provides for drivers to access 900 homes - about the same as Orchard Park.

This is the only access route for drivers, though cyclists have many other routes and can use this as one of several through routes to other destinations.

As this is a bicycle road drivers may not overtake cyclists, and the road environment is designed very much to slow down cars. Bicycles are considered to be "guests" on this street ("auto te gast"), as on many others in Houten and elsewhere in the Netherlands.

Photo taken during Study Tour in 2011 in Houten:
hembrow.blogspot.com/2011/05/houten-visit-and-discussion.html
www.hembrow.eu/studytour
Road environment:
Good practice
road
28499Photo #28499Groningerstraat in Assen. This is a street the same width as Gilbert Road in Cambridge. The layout is extremely good for cycling, and residents get to keep their on-road car parking:

hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/groningerstraat

Update: There's a misconception that this photo shows danger due to "the door zone". Actually that's not a problem on this street or with this design and there are several reasons why:

* A buffer is designed into the parking space. That's the light brick colour which this car has unfortunately been parked partly on top.

* Parking here is for residents. These cars don't move frequently so door openings are relatively uncommon.

* It's the convention to cycle on the right in the Netherlands, meaning that cyclists generally ride as far as possible from the car. You'll note that three cyclists are visible in this photo and they are all riding on the right.

* The width of the cycle-path, just short of 2.5 m in this location, means that a car door can in any case not span a very large part of the cycle-path

* If the door is opened and a cyclist swerves, the kerbstones between cycle-path and pavement are at 45 degrees. You can safely ride over this without falling (photos and video demonstration: www.aviewfromthecyclepath.com/2008/12/danger-of-parallel-kerbs.html )

* Cyclists who think there is a danger of being "doored" ahead of them can change direction or stop without having to worry about the danger of motor vehicles in their lane.

* The driver's seat in this car is on the left. Therefore the most often opened door is also on the left, away from the cycle-path (at least one car ahead is parked backwards, though).

* If, despite all above, a cyclist was "doored" here, they would fall on the cycle-path and not on the road in front of a motor vehicle. This reduces the likely effect of a "dooring".

Dooring is actually extremely rare in the Netherlands. Design like this is a reason why. If this cycle-path was instead a narrow cycle-lane on the left of the car, most of the points above would be invalid.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
28498Photo #28498Groningerstraat in Assen. This is a street the same width as Gilbert Road in Cambridge. The layout is extremely good for cycling, and residents get to keep their on-road car parking:

hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/groningerstraat

At this point, the car parking switches to the other side of the street. It alternates.
Car storage:
Good practice
carstorage
28497Photo #28497Groningerstraat in Assen. This is a street the same width as Gilbert Road in Cambridge. The layout is extremely good for cycling, and residents get to keep their on-road car parking:

hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/groningerstraat
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
28496Photo #28496Groningerstraat in Assen. This is a street the same width as Gilbert Road in Cambridge. The layout is extremely good for cycling, and residents get to keep their on-road car parking:

hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/groningerstraat
Road environment:
Good practice
road
27534Photo #27534It's -7 C, there's snow and ice everywhere and has been for days, but the cycle superhighway between Assen and Vries has just occasional patches of difficult to shift ice.

hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/12/sunday-ride-through-snowy-landscape.html
Cycleway:
Misc
cycleways
27318Photo #27318It's -7 C this morning, the 1st of December. Quite windy too, the the wind-chill adds considerably to how cold it feels. However, while the canal is frozen, the cycle paths are regularly gritted and salted and remain clear of ice.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
27252Photo #27252We've had a light dusting of snow here in Assen. It's -2 C. All cyclepaths have been swept and gritted and children continue to cycle to school as usual.Cycleway:
Misc
cycleways
24244IconPhoto #24244German cycle paths are too close to the road, even in rural areas where it is possible for them to be better spaced from the road. Watch the video to see how on crossing the border into the Netherlands, the cyclepath position changes, and the surface becomes better (in this case the width doesn't improve for a while, though). See still photo at #24243

hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/05/german-cycle-paths-vs-dutch-cycle-paths.html
Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
24243Photo #24243German cycle paths are too close to the road, even in rural areas where it is possible for them to be better spaced from the road. Watch the video to see how on crossing the border into the Netherlands, the cyclepath position changes, and the surface becomes better (in this case the width doesn't improve for a while, though). See video at #24244

hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/05/german-cycle-paths-vs-dutch-cycle-paths.html
Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
24242Photo #24242German cycle path in town. Too narrow, shared with pedestrians, rough surface, frequently obstructed by motor vehicles and with posts on the path.

hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/05/german-cycle-paths-vs-dutch-cycle-paths.html
Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
24241Photo #24241German cycle path. Too narrow, too close to the road, not well enough surfaced, cars parked on it.

hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/05/german-cycle-paths-vs-dutch-cycle-paths.html
Other:
Problem
general
24240Photo #24240It's great to see so many solar roofs in Germany, but the cycle paths are a bit wanting. This two metre wide cycle path is simply too narrow for use in two directions at once, and it's too close to the road.

hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/05/german-cycle-paths-vs-dutch-cycle-paths.html
Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
24239Photo #24239German road junction and cycle path design. There are many problems with this relative to Dutch design.

o The cycle path is too narrow and not as well surfaced as the road.
o The cycle path is too close to the road. No real separation.
o At the junction, the cycle path gives way to the road..
o The corner radii are very large for drivers, encouraging high speeds and making the distance greater for cyclists to cross.
o There are posts on the cycle path.

hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/05/german-cycle-paths-vs-dutch-cycle-paths.html
Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
24136Photo #24136A nice wide (2.5 m for single direction use) smooth cycle path in the Netherlands. Quite normal for the Netherlands, but the reason for this photo is the vegetation along the side of the path. It's trimmed very neatly so that cyclists can see drivers on the road and drivers can see cyclists.

The separation from the road at this point is about four metres, which is enough to give a good degree of subjective safety.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
21453Photo #21453Sinner Mangos lined up outside the factory. Some new ready for customers, some test ride Mangos and the one I commute in.

www.ligfietsgaragegroningen.nl/
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
21087Photo #21087Essen in Germany. One of the city's rare cyclists waits to cross the road. The roads here are built on an enormous scale, and driving is easily the most popular means of transport. Cyclists are expected to use the pavements along with pedestrians, and there are very few cyclists. A multiple stage crossing such as this can take a long time to get across.

Note also the pedestrian walk-way in the background which doubles the distance from one side of the road to the other for pedestrians who cross using it.
Bicycle:
Problem
bicycles
21086Photo #21086Essen in Germany. A street with (slightly) restricted access for cars and a low speed limit, but along which cyclists have to ride in the space between many parked cars, and on which pedestrians have to negotiate many cars parked on the pavement.Car storage:
Misc
carstorage
21085Photo #21085Cars routinely park all over the pavements in Essen, Germany. The city has a very low rate of cycling, and infrastructure which is almost entirely designed around the car. In this photo drivers are provided with many lanes to drive along, while cyclists are expected to share the pavement with pedestrians - and parked cars.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
21084Photo #21084Cycle route signs in Essen, Germany. A self proclaimed "fahrrad freundeliche stadt", Essen has a very low rate of cycling largely due to infrastructure which massively favours driving. While there are four lanes for cars in one direction on this street, cyclists are expected to share the pavement with pedestrians.Route sign:
Infrastructure
routesigns
20956Photo #20956Jim McGurn adds to the bicycle tyre tracks in newly fallen snow early on Sunday morning, while riding my Sinner Mango velomobile.Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
20650Photo #20650The headline "Assen still has enough gritting salt". The photo above it shows how pot-holes are dealt with before they have a chance to get serious. They're fixed even before the winter has gone.

A gas burner is used to melt the ice away and the holes are filled and smoothed over immediately. It needs to be done like this. It's still -8 C half way through February.

To keep high quality road surfaces, road maintenance can't stand still for half the year.

See also #20471 for the other way that pot-holes are avoided: immaculately smooth surfaces which don't have gaps for ice to form in.
Pothole:
Good practice
potholes
20607Photo #20607The canal next to this cycle path freezes regularly, so it's a good chance for people to skate.Cycleway:
Event
cycleways
20606Photo #20606Cycle paths are also useful for joggersOther:
Misc
general
20603Photo #20603Heading into Glimmen near Groningen in the Netherlands. There is snow all around again, but the cycle path is clear. As I took this photo I was gaining quite rapidly on the snow plough that you see in the photo. The cycle path between Groningen where I work and Assen where I live ( 30 km long ) is broad enough that a normal snow plough, actually a 4x4 with snow plow attachment, can be driven along the path, so no special vehicles are required.

Anyway, the snow plough was going at 35 km/h, and I was going faster, so I pulled out onto the road for a km or so to get past it.

It was about -4 C when this photo was taken.
Congestion:
Good practice
congestion
20543IconPhoto #20543The main road, with a speed limit of 70 km/h, runs alongside this minor road which has been made into a through road only for cyclists. This is a cheap and effective way of building good cycling infrastructure.

Note that while we stop at a set of traffic lights here, the timing is the same as if we'd been on the road. What's more, the next set apply only to drivers and we ride right on whatever colour they are.

Note also the noise barriers to reduce the impact of the sound of cars at 70 km/h on residents. It is rare in the Netherlands to find a road which could cause a noise nuisance which doesn't have such barriers. Also, the road surfaces used create less noise in the first place.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20542Photo #20542At last the snow has gone away, but it was back to -8 C today. Nevertheless, this woman was cycling with three children in her bakfiets.Bicycle:
Good practice
bicycles
20488Photo #20488Parking at the DIY again. This time it was snowing / sleeting when I left home, and I wanted to be warm and dry. Compare with a few weeks ago when there was more snow: #20167

The parking at this shop isn't fantastic, but it seems to be enough, and at least they keep this area free of snow and ice (it's better than the car park).
Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
20486IconPhoto #20486Entering the village of Loon (pronounced like the English word "loan") near Assen in the Netherlands. Note the 30 km/h speed limit common to most villages, and how cyclists completely avoid what would be dangerous traffic calming as they enter the village.

Also note that there are cycle paths linking the villages together, well used by commuters, shoppers and school children - even in this weather. No local schools closed due to the snow, and some secondary school children made journeys of over 10 km each way through it.

The snow has been almost completely cleared from both the cycle path and the road, even though as you see from a slightly later part of the same video, there was rather a lot of it.

The other end of the same village can be seen in #13742

I'm riding a Sinner Mango velomobile.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20472Photo #20472Cycle path next to frozen canal (people have been skating here recently) mostly cleared of yet another layer of snow, and regular cycle traffic continuing as it always does.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20471Photo #20471Immaculate four metre wide cycle-path surface without potholes despite many freeze and thaw cycles. This is the result of a high standard of path construction and maintenance.

See #20650 for an example of what is done to fix potholes where they do arise.
Roadworks:
Good practice
roadworks
20422Photo #20422While the snow has mostly gone, it was -4 C today and the canals were still completely frozen. These children went skating after school, travelling by bike, of course.Other:
Misc
general
20221Photo #20221Yesterday's early snowfall turned to rain and you can see that this has washed away a lot of the remaining snow and ice. It's 2 C today, which is warmer than it's been for a month.

This cycle path along the canal was kept clear by snow ploughs through the colder period, but only to the width of the plough itself. You can see the roughly 2.5 metre width of the snow plough on this 4 metre cycle path.

The canal is still frozen solid, and will be for some time to come.

Compare with #20210 which was taken in the same spot a few days previously.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20220Photo #20220Someone returning to the suburbs from the centre of the city by bicycle.

The cycle path she is on goes through an underpass to avoid the traffic lights which drivers have to stop at. It has remained usable through all the ice and snow that we've had.

Today the snow is melted a little as yesterday's early snowfall turned to rain.

Assen in the Netherlands.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20219Photo #20219An elderly neighbour sets off for the shops by bike. Quite normal as a quarter of all journeys by over 65s in the Netherlands are by bicycle. She, like everyone else, has continued right through the snowBicycle:
Misc
bicycles
20218Photo #20218Noordelijke Velomobieltocht 2010 near Assen. Wide cycle path in the countryside, two metres of which is cleared of snow - sufficient for two velomobiles to travel next to each other.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20215Photo #20215Northern velomobile ride near Assen in the Netherlands. Note the extremely wide cycle path completely clear of ice and snow, which was falling overnight a few hours beforehand.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20214Photo #20214Northern velomobile ride near Assen in the Netherlands. Note the completely clear, ploughed and gritted cycle path despite a few cm of snow a couple of hours earlier.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20213Photo #20213Another day, another snowy ride. A picture from the Northern Velomobile Ride, in Drenthe, Netherlands. Entering a village on a nice gritted minor road. Note the 30 km/h speed limit which is in most villages. 60 km/h is the speed limit for country roads.Road environment:
Good practice
road
20210Photo #20210Racing cyclists training in Assen in the snow next to a frozen canal. It's a good thing they can rely on getting some grip on the cycle path surface. Maybe we'll get a thaw eventually.

Compare with #20221 which was taken two days later when the temperature got above freezing and it rained.
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
20167Photo #20167Snow heaped high at the DIY in Assen. At least they've kept some of the cycle parking clear.

These stands support bicycles very well, because they hold a good proportion of the front wheel. As they are of alternating heights they also allow the cycle park to be compact.

See also #20488
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
20166Photo #20166A cycle and pedestrian bridge in Assen. The temperature stays stubbornly below zero and this bridge hasn't been cleared quite so well as it could have been (see other photos tagged snow for a comparison)Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20145Photo #20145Snow continues to fall daily, including today. However, there great majority of cycle paths are still good to ride on and there are still plenty of cyclists in the centre of Assen, even as it goes dark enough that cyclists are reduced to a mere blur.Road environment:
Good practice
road
20144Photo #20144The snow continues to fall daily, but most of the cycle paths remain clear here in Assen.Other:
Good practice
general
20139Photo #20139Cyclists on cycle paths both sides of the road. The temperature remains below freezing, a little snow was falling when I took the photo, but cycle paths are clear of snow and ice and shopping trips are still by bike. Assen, Netherlands.Road environment:
Good practice
road
20138Photo #20138Still cold, but the postal delivery goes ahead by bike on cycle paths clear of snow and ice. Assen, Netherlands.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20137Photo #20137A group of children cycling together in Assen. Temperatures remain below zero, and the roads and cycle paths remain clear of ice and snow. Assen, Netherlands.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20127Photo #20127This cycle path in the countryside a few kilometres outside of Assen in the Netherlands is much more important than the road. Therefore the cycle path is clear while the road (on the left) is completely covered in snow. Video showing the path is here:

www.youtube.com/watch

The same path in the summer is in photo #11785
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20126Photo #20126A nice ride in the middle of the Dutch countryside when the temperature is -6 C and there is 12 cm of snow. The cycle paths were of course almost completely free of snow.

More of the story plus video here:
hembrow.blogspot.com/2010/01/ride-through-snowy-countryside.html
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20110Photo #20110Cycle path in recreational area cleared of snow in Assen, Netherlands.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20109Photo #20109Bikes parked at a small shopping centre in winter. Assen, Netherlands.Cycle parking:
Misc
cycleparking
20108Photo #20108Four metre wide cycle path completely clear of snow and ice. Assen, Netherlands.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20107Photo #20107Four metre wide cycle path completely clear of ice and snow. Assen, NetherlandsCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20106Photo #20106Cycle path clear of snow. Assen, NetherlandsCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20094Photo #20094Cycle path on the route to a supermarket in Assen, Netherlands. Completely clear of snow, but not quite to the usual four metre width of the path.

There is a road parallel to this cycle path, but it's on the opposite side of that canal. You can see the cars on it if you look at the full size photo and zoom in. A good degree of segregation resulting in high subjective safety.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20093Photo #20093Cycle path completely clear of snow. Assen, Netherlands.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20092Photo #20092The snow plows are only two metres wide, while the cycle path is four metres wide. Some cycle paths therefore end up only half width in the middle of the winter.

Assen, Netherlands.
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
20089Photo #20089Assen, 21st December 2009. Last Thursday and Friday we had 30 cm of snow. The snow continued over the weekend, and it was difficult for the gritters and snow-plows on the cycle paths to keep up. However, on Monday the cycle paths are almost all completely clear, even if as in this case a four metre wide path is down to little over 2 metres cleared.

For a view of the same cycle path without snow, see #15787

This photo is one of a set which can be seen here:
hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/12/mondays-cycle-paths-mostly-snow-free.html
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
19972Photo #19972Another day, another sweeper. Leaves being removed from a 4 metre wide main cycle path in AssenRoadworks:
Good practice
roadworks
19971Photo #19971To me the cycle path already looked adequately empty of leaves. In the Netherlands cycle paths always do. All the time. However, here comes the leaf sweeper again just to make sure.

3 metre wide secondary cycle path behind a residential suburb in Assen.

There's another example here: hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/11/autumn-leaves.html
Roadworks:
Good practice
roadworks
19872Photo #19872Mike Sleep with one of his home built bikesBicycle:
Misc
bicycles
19871Photo #19871Mike Sleep riding one of his home built bikesOther:
Misc
general
19870Photo #19870The main bus station in Eindhoven. It's completely separate from the cycle access, so completely avoids conflict between cyclists and buses.Other:
Good practice
general
19869Photo #19869The bus station in Eindhoven. Conflict between buses and cyclists is eliminated by sending buses on completely different routes from cyclists. This bus station is one side of the railway station and the cycle entrance to the railway station is on the other side.Other:
Good practice
general
19168Photo #19168On the left, a recumbent trike on the road in Assen. It's slightly more practical as a means of transport than the Segway on the right...Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
19167Photo #19167Completely black Sinner Mango velomobile at an event in Assen.

More details here: hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/10/biomotion-tour.html
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
19145Photo #19145Russell waits for Jolanda to finish racing her Sinner Mango in Groningen.

www.lfgg.nl
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
19144Photo #19144Sinner Mango velomobile fitted with a racing hood on the cycle racing circuit in Groningen.

www.lfgg.nl
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
19143Photo #19143Sinner Mango velomobile under construction at the ligfietsgarage in Groningen

www.lfgg.nl/
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
19105Photo #19105Judy trying out an ICE Trice borrowed for a customer. Nice wide and smooth cycle path, plenty of separation from the road.

There's a video here:
hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/10/judy-tries-some-trikes.html
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
19104Photo #19104Another village with a 30 km/h speed limit. I've yet to find an exception, so I think all villages must now have this speed limit in the Netherlands.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
19084Photo #19084Sign for a dog walking path where dogs may be allowed off their leads.

It isn't only cyclists who have segregation in the Netherlands. There are also dog walking paths like this, fishing paths, walking paths etc. Rarely does a cyclist have a problem caused by other users of the same path with different behaviour.

You can see a video of this path here: www.youtube.com/watch
Other:
Misc
general
18991Photo #18991David riding in a Sinner Mango velomobile. These are one of the world's fastest practical bicycles. Aerodynamics mean that great speeds are possible with the same effort on the pedals - they also have a fully enclosed drive-chain so need very little maintenance, and keep you warm and dry in the winter. These are built in Groningen by Sinner Ligfietsen.

Various videos and other details of them in action can be seen here:

hembrow.blogspot.com/search/label/sinner%20mango
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
18330Photo #18330Flevotrike. The owner is replacing the normal rear wheels so that he can have drum brake hubs. These will require a bit of work but give more reliable braking, especially downhill. The new wheels are actually new Mango wheels.Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
18329Photo #18329Challenge Hurricane recumbent. Bikes like this are considered to be quite extreme, perhaps "too low" in traffic in the UK, but not in the Netherlands. The basket on the back is used to transport a dog.Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
18173Photo #18173After racing on closed streets in the centre of Leer, our bikes were on display.

Video, race results etc. can be found here:
hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/08/leer-european-championships.html
Bicycle:
Infrastructure
bicycles
18172Photo #18172German cycle path. Separate from the road, but not even a metre wide even though it's used for both directions, bumpy, with manhole covers etc. and with unclear junctions. These are not built to anything like the same standard as Dutch cycle paths, and as a result it's no surprise that driving seems rather more popular than cycling.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
18171Photo #18171Not a good photo, but indicative of the problems with German cyclepaths. Too narrow, huge gates to stop bikes getting on them etc. A bit like England, though with rather more of a comprehensive network, and nothing like the way the Dutch do things.Other:
Infrastructure
general
18169Photo #18169A short trip over the border into Germany. Cyclepaths here are narrow and badly surfaced, so it is hardly surprising that cars are so much more popular than bikes.Cycleway:
Infrastructure
cycleways
17982Photo #17982A small proportion of the cycle parking in Assen during the TT. This event brings over 100000 visitors to the city, where the usual population is just 65000. A large proportion of the visitors bring their bikes with them and like the locals they use them for access to the city centre in the evening to experience the live music on mulitple stages. The result is that tens of thousands of extra bikes have to be parked.

There is space for them all. That also goes for other large events here. Cycle parking is always quite generous.

The cars that you see in the very left most part of the photo are resident's cars for people who live on the right hand side. The road is a "bicycle road" on which drivers have to give way to cyclists, and which is a through road only for cyclists.

On the Google satelite images you see a car park on the left of this view. It is no longer there and has been replaced with an area for events such as this.
Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
17627Photo #17627Alongside the road at this point is a service road which provides one way access only to houses for residents with cars and a two way through route for everyone by bike.

The service road is being resurfaced and so cyclists are provided with redirection signs to show the replacement route. "Doorgaand Fietsverkeer" means "through going cycle traffic".

There is also the alternative of using the segregated cycle path on the other side of the road (behind the photographer).
Temporary closure:
Good practice
closure
17082Photo #17082Bike with modified trailer parked outside a DIY shop in Assen, Netherlands.

The interesting thing about this trailer is that it has been converted to have three wheels. The third is the front half of a child's scooter (red). It is towed from the handlebars of the scooter, meaning that the front wheel of the trailer turns as the trailer turns.

I suspect that this modification is to make the trailer work well as a hand cart when off the bike.

There were two trailers modified in this way at the shop at the same time.

The owner had left whatever they'd bought at a previous shop, in the white box, in this trailer as they went into the shop.

There are many bicycle trailers in the area, a good percentage of which are home made or modified.
Bicycle:
Misc
bicycles
16644Photo #16644Brand new utterly smooth cycle pathCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
16642Photo #16642Raised section of cycle path / access road by bus stopCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
16641Photo #16641Brand new utterly smooth cycle path. Several km long. Planned in 2008. Complete in 2009.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
16640Photo #16640Brand new utterly smooth upgraded surfaceCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
16639Photo #16639Brand new utterly smooth cycle pathCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
16638Photo #16638Brand new utterly smooth cycle pathCycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
16605Photo #16605A one way road and a two way cycle path cross this opening bridge. The cycle path is as wide as the road. It needs to be. There are far more cyclists than drivers.

To see how busy this bridge is at rush hour, see this video: www.youtube.com/watch
Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways

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