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Photos

Showing items 1 to 100 from total of 3,396 items. Ordered by location # descending.

Location # Icon Video Photo Caption Categorisation
190175Photo #190175[Image taken 27.1.23] Brunch, Auster Road, Clifton Moor, York. Context and link: #190174.Other:
Problem
general
190174Photo #190174[Image taken 27.1.23] Brunch, Auster Road, Clifton Moor, York. [NOTE: No streetview at this location] Wheelbenders and Tier hire e-cycles and e-scooters. Location: #190175. Tier overview: #190175.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
190173Photo #190173[Image taken 25.1.23] Field View, York. The person who has parked next to the hedge is completely obstructing the pavement. The person must know his/her actions forces people - their neighbours, many vulnerable - to walk in the road. Other image this issue here today and links: #190172.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
190172Photo #190172[Image taken 25.1.23] Field View, York. The resident is obstructing the pavement. Yet she/he must see their neighbours - people of all ages including adults with assistance dogs and mobility aids, and children going to school - walking in the road as they can't use the pavement. Other image this issue here today: #190173. Other image today and links: #190043.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
190171Photo #190171[Image taken 25.1.23] Former Duncombe Barracks, Burton Stone Lane, York. This will be the site of Duncombe Square (www.shapehomesyork.com/) a development of passivhaus homes. Today though, it was a quagmire. Someone who said he was a council employee was working with a brush to try to keep the mud off the pavement. Cycling southbound and passing a few hours later, the road was muddy from here to the junction with Bootham/Clifton. Plus there were large gravel-like stones along the length. Liquid mud and loose stones are real hazards for people on cycles. Plus the former coats panniers and cycles. Other image today and links: #190043.Road environment:
Problem
road
190170Photo #190170[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane (looking south), York. This motorist is obstructing the pavement. Opposite a church. There's no room for someone with a buggy, holding the hand of a child or person they care for to pass. Ditto for the many mobility impaired people who use walking aids, mobility scooters and wheelchairs round here. Other image today and links: #190043.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
190169Photo #190169[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane opposite St Luke's church, York. Verge damage by drivers. More of this damage here today and links: #190168.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
190168Photo #190168[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, opposite Shipton Street, York. Verge damage caused by motorists driving on to and off it. Not only unsightly the mud released is a pavement hazard for pedestrians and a road one for people on cycles. More of this damage here today: #190169. Other image today and links: #190043.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
190167Photo #190167[Image taken 25.1.23] Outside St Luke's church, Burton Stone Lane, junction wiith Shipton Street, York. Centreline tarmac damage at a road narrowing. That infra requires people on cycles to move out into the carriageway. Cyclists ought to be riding assertively here ie taking the lane to stop a motorist trying to squeeze past. And then to hold that line and keep at least 1.5m away from the parked vehicles in case someone opens a door from the inside or steps out from between them. Then there's that access cover. Slippery when wet/icy and with an upstand around the edge that can cause an instant flat tyre. (Note that the tarmac around it on the road side is already cracking.) In short, this damage is where someone on a cycle, including with machines with, three wheels might be riding. It's a substantial hazard and I will report it. I thought this section was resurfaced late last year. Has it failed already? Or was it done in halves? Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190166Photo #190166[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, junction with Shipton Street, with St Luke's (church) behind, York. Location of damage to kerb in: #190165.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190165Photo #190165[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, outside St Luke's church, York. Cracking tarmac close to the kerb. Few people in York have learned to ride assertively. Plus low driving standards and high motorist speeds can force even the bravest cyclist into the gutter. Location: #190166. Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190164Photo #190164[Image taken 25.1.23] Shipton Street junction with Burton Stone Lane, York. Centreline tarmac damage and potholes at a junction. All of this is a serious problem for people cycling. At any location. But the high speeds, and low standards of driving or responsibility of motorists on Burton Stone Lane increases the need for the road surface to be intact and safe. This looks like damage caused by water ingress and freezing. But it looks like new tarmac. Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190163Photo #190163[Image taken 25.1.23] Outside 150 Burton Stone Lane, York. This looks like new tarmac. It seems to be already failing. The carriageways on this street are narrow, driving speeds much higher than the 20mph limit and people in cycles have to be able to: (i) look around them - not down; (ii) move on the road to where they need to, to be safe and escape danger. This damage will very soon be a pothole and put people on cycles at further risk. Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190162Photo #190162[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, junction with Glencoe Street, York. Is this new tarmac that is already failing around an ironwork? Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190161Photo #190161[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, looking north from outside Heron Foods, York. Centreline tarmac damage. Damage in the other direction and links see: #190160. Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190160Photo #190160[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane looking south just before the junction with Glencoe Street, York. Centre line damage to the tarmac. A real hazard for people cycling see: #190158. Continuation of the damage northbound see: #190161. Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190159Photo #190159[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. Detail and links see: #190158.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190158Photo #190158[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, just north of the junction with Glencoe Street, York. Centre line damage. This is a serious hazard for people cycling. It can trap wheels and/or 'hold' them. Water gets under the surface, freezes, expands, causes cracking and the potholes. Is this new tarmac (see: #190157) that has already failed in all directions? Location see: #190159. Other image today and links: #190043.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
190157Photo #190157[Image taken 25.1.23] Horner Street junction with Burton Stone Lane, York. Substantial tarmac damage and where pedestrians and people in mobility scooters will be crossing. This is new tarmac. Parts of Burton Stone Lane were patched and resurfaced in November 2022 (www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/23076028.burton-stone-lane-clifton-york-close-2-sections/) yet the works are already failing. (Note the latest incarnation of the restuarant/takeaway on the corner. It opened during lockdown 2020 as Voujon Spice. This closed then opened as Clifton Spice and Grill. That closed in autumn 2022. The new banner is heralding the arrival of Royal Spice. On 27.1.23 I noticed that the space where the van in this image is standing has been covered in Astroturf. Presumably not bowls/petanque coming to this corner but an external eating area.) Other image today and links: #190043.Other:
Problem
general
190156Photo #190156[Image taken 25.1.23] York Suzuki Centre, Burton Stone Lane, York. Damage that is a substantial trip hazard on the forecourt of the York Suzuki Centre (www.yorksuzuki.com/). I hope CYC can compel the owners to repair it. Other image forecourt damage near here today and links: #190155.Other:
Problem
general
190155Photo #190155[Image taken 25.1.23] Pizza Time, Burton Stone Lane junction with Garth Terrace, York. Forecourt damage. A hazard to all users. I'll report to CYC. I think the forecourts here belong to the building owners not the Council. However, I hope CYC can contact the owners and compel them to repair it. Other image forecourt damage near here today: #190156. Image pavement damage near here today: #190153, #190154. Other image today and links: #190043.Other:
Problem
general
190154Photo #190154[Image taken 25.1.23] Garth Terrace, junction with Burton Stone Lane, York. Context: #190153. Other image today and links: #190043.Other:
Problem
general
190153Photo #190153[Image taken 25.1.23] Garth Terrace, junction with Burton Stone Lane, York. Pavement damage. Detail nearest area: #190154. Other image today and links: #190043.Other:
Problem
general
190152Photo #190152[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. The only formal crossing on the entire length of Burton Stone Lane. Driving speeds are very high and not every motorist stops to let people cross. There are a couple of build-outs but it all too often feels as if you are taking your life in your hands to cross this road. Changes to the infrastructure here in November 2022 have exacerbated the existing problems on this street and added new ones: #187753. Other image today and links: #190043.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
190056Photo #190056[Image taken 25.1.23] LNER 20.11 Doncaster to York service. Following pressure from passengers who could no longer travel or who struggled to travel due to the Azumas having hooks for cycles and their use being mandatory, LNER retrofitted runners. These didn't help this passenger - there was simply no space in the designated area.
I don't believe I would be able to use these not least due to the restricted space and the need to - as here - manoeuvre your cycle from the 'wrong', the chain, side. I couldn't use the runners in the guard’s vans pre-Azuma - when space and side of approach were not an issue. LNER did not respond to requests from me and others who cannot lift their cycles to try them – pre-installation, when they could have been adapted (or simply not installed and money saved), or now they are on every Azuma (according to LNER). In short, many of us remain unable to travel on any LNER service with our cycles.
Hitachi built these services. And the others in use on long-distance routes around the country… TransPannine, GWR… In October 2021, Jim Brewin, whose Linked in page says he is Chief Director UK & Ireland at Hitachi Rail, and “...who has a passion for engaging stakeholders for effective solution based sales and project delivery” at Hitachi agreed to a meeting in York. It was with three women from this city. None of us can lift our cycles (or those of younger family members) onto hooks. Further our cycles are set up for utility use so won’t fit in the limited space. A tandem user from London who used to travel with her son also wanted to contribute to the meeting. Covid intervened so the first possible date was 18 January 2023. The date was put in all our diaries in October 2022. The person from London felt she could not attend the meeting in person but put together a 4-page document with images detailing the effect of the hooks and limited space on her and her family. On Tuesday, 10 January 2023 at 11:27 - seven days before the meeting - it was cancelled. The email said: “It is with regret that Jim will not be able to meet with you on Wednesday 18th, this is due to dynamic diary movements.”
Despite several emails since I have not managed to find out what that phrase means. (It’s not in my vocabulary.) I have also asked for new dates – bearing in mind all attendees have to fit a meeting into our diaries too. As of 28.1.23 I have not received the courtesy of a reply.
The email further said: “I can understand your frustration with this situation and to endeavour you receive a response as quickly as possible I would suggest contacting the train operator, the reason being is because here at Hitachi Rail we build our trains based on the specific designs created by the operators therefore, they would be your first point of contact.”
However, Hitachi designs the trains. Therefore they can flag up problems – or should be able to. Some of the points I wanted to raise at the meeting included:
- my concern no-one at Hitachi raised the queries: 
– Can everyone who needs to, use the hooks?
– Can everyone who will want to travel with a cycle, be able to do so?
- If no-one asked, why didn't anyone at Hitachi raise these points? Is there no-one trained in accessibility? Equality?
Or,
- did someone raise the issues but was ignored? Or was overridden?
In December 2022, Hitachi won the contract for HS2 https://social-innovation.hitachi/en/article/hs2/
It needs to change the cycle carriage design to accommodate everyone who wants to travel with a cycle. Otherwise another generation will not be able to travel with their cycles.
I have asked the Hitachi contact to forward my requests for new dates to Andrew Barr. His Linked in page says he is Group Chief Executive Officer at Hitachi Rail. He was the person I started with in late September 2021.
Other:
Problem
general
190048Photo #190048[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. Context and links: #190047.Road environment:
Problem
road
190047Photo #190047[Image taken 25.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. This company – Garlands – has been blocking this cycle facility before. It also means any road user at this end of the measures installed in November 2022 (see: #187753) have no sight lines. Other image here today: #190048. Other image today and links: #190043.Road environment:
Problem
road
190046Photo #190046[Image taken 25.1.23] Foss Islands Path junction with Wigginton Road link/Crichton Avenue/Denning’s Yard, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] One of the artworks (www.kjartan.co.uk/blue%20pipes/index.htm) on the Foss Islands Path. Taken as part of my ‘cleared’ series: #189553 and links, #189796 and links. There are often unsettling characters sitting here. For this reason, it and the bridge hole behind, can be unsafe feeling at dusk and after dark. Other image today and links: #190043.Track:
Problem
track
190045Photo #190045[Image taken 25.1.23] Foss Islands Path junction with Wigginton Road link, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] You would come off if you cycled into this thick mud. On foot you’d get very muddy. A child might lose a boot or shoe. A pedestrian with a buggy or walking aid could get stuck and/or fall. Location and links: #190044.General sign/notice:
Problem
signs
190044Photo #190044[Image taken 25.1.23] Wigginton Road link, junction with Foss Islands Path, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Note the thick mud: #190045. Context and links: #190043.General sign/notice:
Problem
signs
190043Photo #190043[Image taken 25.1.23] Foss Islands Path junction with Wigginton Road link, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Poor surface sign. Where does it refer to? Why is it here? I’ll report it to Sustrans (sustrans.org.uk) as they own this land. Location: #190044. Other image here today: #190045. Other image nearby today: #190046. Other images today: #190047, #190048, #190056, #190152, #190153, #190154, #190155, #190156, #190157, #190158, #190159, #190160, #190161, #190162, #190163, #190164, #190165, #190166, #190167, #190168, #190169, #190170, #190171, #190172, #190173.General sign/notice:
Problem
signs
189807Photo #189807[Image taken 23.1.23] Clifton Backies, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Other image here today - context and links: #189806.Track:
Event
track
189806Photo #189806[Image taken 23.1.23] Clifton Backies, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location. Location approximate.] Some of the ravines and gashes have been marked up for filling. Context: #186002. Other image here today: #189807. Other image today and links: #189794.Track:
Event
track
189805Photo #189805[Image taken 23.1.23] Kitchener Street at entrance to/exit from Foss Islands Path, York. Context: and links #189804.Road environment:
Problem
road
189804Photo #189804[Image taken 23.1.23] Kitchener Street at entrance to/exit from Foss Islands Path, York. Context: #189549. Other image here today and links: #189805.Road environment:
Problem
road
189803Photo #189803[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Context and links: #189802.Other:
Problem
general
189802Photo #189802[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] The narrow, steep and uneven steps between the Foss Islands Path and Denning’s Yard access/Crichton Avenue. Note the bare earth alongside where people push cycles. Top of the steps: #189803 Context and links: #189796.Other:
Problem
general
189801Photo #189801[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Route to/from Wigginton Road (location: #189799). It’s steep and narrow. And if you go down you need to regain that height so I, and others, do not use it but remain on the narrow and intimidating Wigginton Road to the junction with Denning’s Yard access/Crichton Avenue. Context and links: #189796.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
189800Photo #189800[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] There are often shady characters under the bridge. It does not feel safe when there are. But the route is very well used so the constant active travel traffic helps. Context and links: #189796.Other:
Infrastructure
general
189799Photo #189799[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] The shared use path to the right leads to/from Wigginton Road: #189801. Context and links: #189796.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
189798Photo #189798[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Context and links: #189796. Other image this artwork: #190046 and caption.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
189797Photo #189797[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Context and links: #189796.Cycleway:
Good practice
cycleways
189796Photo #189796[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Image taken after the sides of the path have been cleared to show how much more room there is, how much lighter it is, and to my mind, how much safer it is. Other images this theme today: #189797, #189798, #189799, #189800, #189801, #189802, #189803. Other image (and links) of the Foss Islands Path clear of encroaching foliage: #189553. Other image here today and links: #189794.Cycleway:
Event
cycleways
189795Photo #189795[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Looking towards Denning's Yard from the Sustrans spiral. Other image today - context - and links: #189794.Other:
Event
general
189794Photo #189794[Image taken 23.1.23] Foss Islands Path (Denning’s Yard/Crichton Ave end), York. Looking into Denning's Yard. Context: #187856. Other image here today: #189795. Other images here today: #189797, #189798, #189799, #189800, #189801, #189802, #189803. Other images today: #189804, #189805, #189806, #189807.Road environment:
Problem
road
189790Photo #189790[Image taken 22.1.23] Scarborough Terrace, York. People step off the steps from the 'glass bridge' and cross to it without checking for road users. Drivers come fast round the corner visible and take it wide. Cyclists need to be able to trust the integrity of the surface beneath their wheels and concentrate on what is happening to the left, right and ahead. Other image here today: #189789.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189789Photo #189789[Image taken 22.1.23] Scarborough Terrace, York. Damaged tarmac that has deteriorated in the past week – York has had freezing temperatures. This road is used by people on foot, cycles, mobility scooters, wheelchairs and with wheeled walkers… because the pavement is narrow and uneven. There are far more ‘people’ users than motor vehicle movements. Other image damage here today: #189790.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189619Photo #189619[Image taken 19.1.23] Tanner Row junction with Rougier Street, York. Lunar New Year 2023 in York: www.visityork.org/events/lunar-new-year: #189618.Other:
Problem
general
189618Photo #189618[Image taken 19.1.23] Tanner Row junction with Rougier Street, York. Clutter and hazards. The fallen Tier scooters (overview here: #164663) are a trip hazard. The rabbit is further clutter. In December CYC took a decision that should keep pavements clear(er) of cafe paraphernalia to help people move around more safely, more easily: www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/23203064.york-council-rubber-stamps-tough-new-rules-pavement-cafes/ Then it puts in this rabbit. Is it feeding back to the DfT the problems the Tier scooters create? I'm also pushing for CYC to adopt the Equal Pavements Pledge www.transportforall.org.uk/campaign/equal-pavements-pledge/Explanation of rabbit (though not justification for) #189619.Other:
Problem
general
189559Photo #189559[Image taken 18.1.23] Foss Islands Path looking towards Hambleton Terrace (Haxby Road end), York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Context and links: #189553.Other:
Good practice
general
189558Photo #189558[Image taken 18.1.23] Foss Islands Path at Haxby Road, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Context and links: #189553.Other:
Good practice
general
189557Photo #189557[Image taken 18.1.23] Foss Islands Path at Haxby Road, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Context and links: #189553.Other:
Good practice
general
189554Photo #189554[Image taken 18.1.23] Foss Islands Path at Haxby Road, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Context and links: #189553.Other:
Good practice
general
189553Photo #189553[Image taken 18.1.23] Foss Islands Path at Haxby Road, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] I took this image, and the others at the same location, to show how much more space there is when the foliage on both sides of a route has been cleared as here. Any user can go right up to the edge of the tarmac. It also feels safer to this route user because the visibility of the route and who is using it is improved. Note the tracks showing the position of cyclists using route – presumably both ascending and descending. They are in the centre. They show routes need to be wide enough for other users to pass in the other direction or faster users to pass slower ones moving in the same direction. Other images here today: #189554, #189557, #189558, #189559. Other image (and links) taken for the same reason nearby: #189796. Other image today and links: #189546.Other:
Good practice
general
189552Photo #189552[Image taken 18.1.23] Foss Islands Road, York. Location of close-up of hazard: #189551. Also visible is the local landmark Morrisons' chimney. (Because it's on the site of the Morrisons supermarket chain.) Other image, other topic today and links: #189546.Other:
Problem
general
189551Photo #189551[Image taken 18.1.23] Foss Islands Road, York. One of many reasons it's important to keep routes clear of dips and damage: water freezes; people on cycles, in wheelchairs, in mobility scooters, etc, skid and fall. Other image here today: #189552. Other image today and links: #189546.Cycleway:
Problem
cycleways
189550Photo #189550[Image taken 18.1.23] Kitchener Street, York. Context and links: #189549. Image clearly showing the road markings: #189805.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
189549Photo #189549[Image taken 18.1.23] Kitchener Street, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Entrance to/from Foss Islands Path/York Orbital. In the time I took to take this image and this one: #189550 a woman with a double buggy, three people on cycles and three pedestrians all had to walk round this vehicle. The drop kerb is completely obstructed so the women with the buggy and the cyclists were unable to use it. In early October 2022, I alerted the York Walking and Cycling Officer to the many problems with this exit/entry here. I'll do it again - with this evidence of need for urgent action. I reported the van to the York Parking Hotline while I was here. Other image today and links: #189546.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
189548Photo #189548[Image taken 18.1.23] Wigginton Road, York. This cyclist has a skinny two-wheeled cycle with no luggage or passengers... But the space is clearly too narrow to pass through easily and safely. The 'feet'/supports of the barriers reduce the usable space (by 20cm) as do the barriers themselves - by 50cm (LTN 1/20 Table 5-3: Additional width at fixed objects assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/951074/cycle-infrastructure-design-ltn-1-20.pdf) Context and links: #189547.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
189547Photo #189547[Image taken 18.1.23] Wigginton Road, York. The space left for all non motorised users on this link used by all ages, for all reasons, on foot with dogs and buggies; hand in hand with children; by people with sight issues; people who are ambulant but with mobility issues; people in wheelchairs, in mobility scooters... and in a sociable three-wheeler called Trixie (see: #186525) and the newer model (see: #187502). Yet the space is just 83cm at its narrowest and 105cm at its widest. I will report this to Northern Gas Networks. On the plus side, the information board - a statutory requirement - is in situ and easy to find. By contrast, CYC continues to flout this requirement at its works. Other image here today: #189548. Other image today and links: #189546.Obstruction:
Problem
obstructions
189546Photo #189546[UPDATE: On 23.1.23 this sign had gone and there were works on the cycle way as far as the entrance to the building site (former Nestle factory) so the only space for all non-motorised users was on the pedestrian side (ie on the left on this image).] [Image taken 18.1.23] Wigginton Road, York. I cannot see why this is needed. I cannot see it will be complied with. It adds clutter and further reduces the available space for all users. I will ask for it to be removed. Other images here today: #189547, #189548. Other images today: #189549, #189550, #189551, #189552, #189553, #189554, #189557, #189558, #189559.General sign/notice:
Event
signs
189540Photo #189540[Image taken 17.1.23] St Hilda’s, Tang Hall Lane, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] We were able to use these wall bars easily. We don't have extra wide handlebars or anything else that would keep our cycles away from the bars. We also have long D-locks. However, one of the organisers of the warm space/cake and tea event we were here for said she was unable to use them. She could not get her 'York' cycle - a design with a front wicker basket close enough to the bars to be able to use her D-lock. Other image here today: #189540.Cycle parking:
Infrastructure
cycleparking
189539Photo #189539[Image taken 17.1.23] St Hilda’s, Tang Hall Lane, York. Clear signage you can’t miss on the front of St Hilda’s www.achurchnearyou.com/church/18968/. Plus the gate was open to the space down the side of the church so there was no confusion over where we needed to take our cycles. Note also the clear and just as easy to find 'Contact details'. Other image here today: #189540.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
189430Photo #189430[Image taken 12.1.23] York Theatre Royal, St Leonard’s Place, York. A 'York' cycle ie a design that is bespoke and/or adapted for carrying people and/or making utility trips. But it is locked only to itself - using the integral nurse's lock. There is cycle parking nearby but you have to know about it: outside the Art Gallery (see: #43971), at the library (see: #186339, #188688) and in Blake Street (see: #178205). A sign directing people to the cycle parking would be good practice. (And more useful than the triangular 1969 Civic Trust award plaque visible in this image.) Other image here today and links: #189428.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
189429Photo #189429[Image taken 12.1.23] York Theatre Royal, St Leonard’s Place, York. Other image here today and links: #189428.Other:
Good practice
general
189428Photo #189428[Image taken 12.1.23] York Theatre Royal, St Leonard’s Place, York. Attractive new landscaping above the pollution and continual traffic movements of St Leonard's Place outside York Theatre Royal (www.yorktheatreroyal.co.uk). I could only see stepped access at the front. Perhaps there is level access from inside. Other images York Theatre Royal today: #189429, #189430. Other image today and links: #189420.Other:
Good practice
general
189426Photo #189426[Image taken 12.1.23] Opposite the entry to/exit from parking between the side of The Churchill Hotel and the residential block Grosvenor House, Grosvenor Terrace, York. Other images of damage here today and links: #189425.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189425Photo #189425[UPDATE: Knocked back by CYC. An email from 24.1.23 says: "The current status of your report is: closed. The problem has been inspected and no follow up work is required."] [Image taken 12.1.23] Grosvenor Terrace, York. This street is not on the list for either Highway resurfacing and surface dressing www.york.gov.uk/roadworks-2/planned-highways-works/2 or Highway large patching www.york.gov.uk/roadworks-2/planned-highways-works/3
I think this list of criteria
www.york.gov.uk/PlannedHighwaysWorks should include 'unattractiveness of alternative routes' and 'actual or perceived lack of safety of alternative routes'. Many people on cycles, mobility scooters, in wheelchairs... use this route north- and southbound because the nearest alternative - Bootham Terrace - is unattractive/hazardous/difficult to use due to the speed cushions. Many cyclists use it to avoid Burton Stone Lane which sees very high driving speeds and since November 2022 is a debacle - see: #187753. Location of this damage and links: #189426.
Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189424Photo #189424[Image taken 12.1.23] Grosvenor Terrace junction with Grosvenor Road, York. Other images of damage here today: #189425, #189426. Other images today and links: #189420.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189423Photo #189423[Image taken 12.1.23] St Leonard’s Place, York. Location of damage in: #189422 plus further damage here. Other image nearby today and links: #189420.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189422Photo #189422[UPDATE: Email from CYC 20.1.23. "Thank you for your Road and Pavement problems report... The current status of your report is: Unresolved. We’re currently coordinating resources so we can schedule the necessary works; in the meantime we thank you for your patience in this matter."][Image taken 12.1.23] St Leonard’s Place, York. Location of this and additional surface damage here today: #189423. Other image and links today: #189420.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189421Photo #189421[Image taken 12.1.23] St Leonard’s Place, junction with Duncombe Place, York. Detail of the unavoidable damage to the tarmac in the ASL. See also: #189420 and links.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189420Photo #189420[UPDATE: 20.1.23 CYC won't be repairing this damage: "Thank you for your Road and Pavement problems report... The current status of your report is: closed. The problem has been inspected and no follow up work is required."
[Image taken 12.1.23] St Leonard’s Place, junction with Duncombe Place, York. Other image this damage: #189421. Other images tarmac damage on St Leonard’s Place today; #189422, #189423. Other images tarmac damage today – Grosvenor Terrace: #189424, #189425, #189426. Images new landscaping outside the Theatre Royal: #189428, #189429, cycle outside the Theatre Royal: #189430.
Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189404Photo #189404[UPDATE: An email from CYC says: "It [My email] has already been passed to the Head of Housing Services who has taken the matter up with contractors." I hope all involved will learn from this and the practice will stop - at work but also in private. ] [UPDATE 16.1.23. A vehicle from this company was here today but it was not on the dropped kerb and there was around 80cm - 1m of space between it and the wall.] [UPDATE: A vehicle from this company was here for at least several hours on both 12 and 13 January 2023 - ie obstructing both the drop kerb and the pavement completely.] [Image taken 11.1.23] Field View, York. There are works at the Council property on the corner of Field View and Tennyson Avenue. No residents were informed of the works - ie ahead of the noise and vibrations that come through walls, etc. Plus every day this week since the works started the pavements have been used as parking. On day one there was one this company's vans on each of the corners - completely obstructing the pavements, and blocking any sight lines. Plus, when they moved this driver moved in: #189307. Is this vehicle also connected to the works? The Council should set standards. It took action when a pavement around 500m away in a neighbouring streets was obstructed (see: #188017). But permits contractors to do the same. This is not a 'nice to have' or an academic problem. There are many people who live in these streets who have children, are elderly, use walking aids, move around in mobility scooters and wheelchairs. Plus many people use this route on their cycles as an alternative to the busy and since November 2022 dangerous Burton Stone Lane (context: #187753). I hope CYC will adopt the Equal Pavements Pledge www.transportforall.org.uk/campaign/equal-pavements-pledge/Route sign:
Problem
routesigns
189403Photo #189403[Image taken 11.1.23] Clifton Moor Retail Park - the area with Dunelm at one end and Tenpin at the other, Stirling Road, York. The bollards are too close to the racks. 140cm is insufficient space even for a standard cycle. When reversing (not easy if your cycle is heavy/laden/has a dependant onboard) the bollard is an obstruction. Not everyone can lift a cycle once or multiple times to reposition it. And even those who can some times or usually may not always be able to do so depending on their health, mobility or what their cycle is laden with on the day. It also seems there is no employee cycle parking at these units. Or perhaps there is but accessing it is not easy or takes too long? There's good natural surveillance from people passing - in daylight. But no protection from the weather. There is a lot of cycle parking on this site. On 11.1.23 the York Walking and Cycling Officer and I met a representative of the company responsible for the maintenance of the site. We spent two hours here. It was cold, very cold, but I dare to hope productive. There is scope for more cycle parking, and better spaced to accommodate larger, longer rigs, and people who need more space to get on/off or to load/unload a dependant. And for it to be under cover. There's lots of seating. But not much greenery. The main issues though are getting onto and off the site from Stirling Road - Dunelm roundabout goo.gl/maps/P3DWfV6xt7reeaqp8 and Stirling Road - Tenpin roundabout goo.gl/maps/a958VrVV3APaVpTPA. Other image today and links: #189401.Cycle parking:
Problem
cycleparking
189402Photo #189402[Image taken 11.1.23] Water Lane, junction with Clifton Moor Gate. York. Context: #183195. Very disappointing this remains unresolved. Get wet feet at the start of your day or shift, on your way to school/work, etc, and you have wet feet for the hours until you can change your shoes/socks, etc. Other image today and links: #189401.Road environment:
Problem
road
189401Photo #189401[Image taken 11.1.23] Bootham, York. Nonsensical, inaccurate, confusing and ultimately therefore clutter. The information is aimed at people on cycles who need to turn right into Bootham Terrace. The 'Ahead' belongs to the information in the first line. This doesn’t show CYC in a good light. Plus there are no information boards required by law to say who is doing what work and how long it will last for. The existence of this sign shows the importance of Bootham Terrace to people who cycle. And therefore they need to be able to make this turn. This is one of my worries about the A19 route: #172109. Further for the surface in the Terrace to be safe and smooth, which it is not: #182586. Other images today: #189402, #189403, #189404.Route sign:
Problem
routesigns
189307Photo #189307[Image taken 10.1.23] Field View, York. Pavement being used as parking. There is a dropped kerb under this vehicle. No pedestrian – no matter how lithe, tall, unencumbered - could get through. Never mind children on scooters or balance bikes, adults holding the hands of dependants, pushing children in buggies, our neighbours (or their visitors) who use walking aids, have an assistance (or any other) dog, local residents (or their friends and relatives) in mobility scooters or wheelchairs. Other image today: #189305.Enforcement:
Problem
enforcement
189305Photo #189305[Image taken 10.1.23] Filey Terrace, York. I saw today the pavement is now ‘open’ again. Although the presence of scaffolding makes it narrower than it already is. Context: #188017. Other image today: #189307.Enforcement:
Event
enforcement
189238Photo #189238[Image taken 9.1.23] Field View junction with Burton Stone Lane, York. Many people on cycles use this junction either because they live on the roads between Burton Stone Lane and the York-Scarborough rail line or because they are filtering through those quieter less trafficked streets from Bootham. But exiting onto Burton Stone Lane is not straightforward nor easy. Vehicles parked opposite narrow the carriageway and reduce the sightlines, as do vehicles that stop on the corner to the right (the drivers/passengers are almost always picking up food from or, despite the double yellows, eating in at Mrs Greedy's cafe). Motorists on Burton Stone Lane often cross the give way markings visible ie encroach into Field View. The extensive damage here puts people on cycles even more at risk and makes it even more difficult and ever less attractive to move around actively. Other image today and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189237Photo #189237[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York.Road environment:
Problem
road
189235Photo #189235[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. When water gets into longitudinal cracks in tarmac and freezes, the resulting cracks are lateral then become potholes as here. A road on which people on cycles are at real risk from fast moving motorists. We must be able to concentrate on what is going on around us not have to worry about the integrity of the tarmac. Other image today and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189234Photo #189234[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. The cavity filled with water has been marked up for repair - the orange paint. But not the remainder of the damaged surface either side of the compromised 'centre line'. It is unavoidable on a cycle. I will report this - and the rest of the damage documented today. Other image today and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189233Photo #189233[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. [NOTE: Street view location approximate.] The linear tarmac damage between Field View and Crichton Avenue. The lateral damage now developing. Context: #189231. Links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189231Photo #189231[Image taken 9.1.23] Outside 225 Burton Stone Lane, York. Tarmac damage that puts people on cycles at real risk. It starts with a linear crack. Water enters, gets under the surface, freezes, expands, creates cracks that radiate out, into which water enters, etc, etc. Context and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189229Photo #189229[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. Deteriorating road surface between Field View and (on the opposite side of the road) Horner Street. Extensive and worsening tarmac damage that puts people using the road, who are not in a motor vehicle, at risk. Other image today and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189228Photo #189228[Image taken 9.1.23] Outside Mrs Greedy's, Burton Stone Lane, York. Location of extensive tarmac damage in: #189226.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189226Photo #189226[Image taken 9.1.23] Outside Mrs Greedy's, Burton Stone Lane, York. Extensive damage unavoidable on a cycle. It is alongside an area that has been patched. Why was this left (to deteriorate)? Location: #189228. Other image today and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189225Photo #189225[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. The area directly around the grating (dimensions see: #187368) is scheduled for repair. But the remainder? I'll report it when I feed back about the other damage here today. Other image today and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189224Photo #189224[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. Location of: #189224.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189223Photo #189223[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane, York. Extensive tarmac damage. The carriageway is made narrower by parked vehicles on the other side. Drivers are aggressive. People on cycles (mobility scooters, wheelchairs) have to move out of the way and ride 'in the gutter'. Including where there is damage. We need the surface to be intact. Other image today and links: #189222.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189222Photo #189222[Image taken 9.1.23] Burton Stone Lane junction with Field View (to the right), York. Where I was standing the tarmac extends from kerb to kerb. It is undamaged. Ahead (direction of Crichton Avenue) is a visible line - the road was tarmaced in halves. The result is a fault line. These create danger for people on cycles in this manifestation. But they quickly lead to extensive further damage. I took images today to show the effect of this practice when rain has fallen, seeped into the crack(s), frozen and caused damage to the tarmac. For people on cycles (likely also motor cycles) and those who cross in mobility scooters or wheelchairs, or using another form of wheeled mobility aid such as a walker, and people pushing buggies, you can get trapped or 'held' in the chasms. From here to Crichton Avenue the signs show 30mph. Speeds are high(er). Drivers on Burton Stone Lane generally do not slow down or give way when faced with someone on a cycle. Every non motorised road user must be able to look around. Every non motorised road user needs intact surfaces so they don't need to look down. Every road user who is not in a motor vehicle must be able to use all parts of the carriageway and not need to try avoid damage as well as other faster users. Other images show other damage at this end of Burton Stone Lane. The greater part - towards Bootham - was repaired/patched in late 2022. Images taken today (all problems reported): Frozen water damage: #189231, #189233, #189234, #189235, #189237. Existing general damage: #189223, #189224, #189225, #189226, #189228, #189229, #189238.Pothole:
Problem
potholes
189181Photo #189181[Image taken 8.1.23] Aldi, Water Lane, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] For people arriving with children by car, or people with mobility issues arriving by car, the parking spaces here are easy to find. Though they are not next to the shop entrance (round the corner) and there are no trolleys here. For people who cycle - who may also have children with them, or be disabled - the arrangement is impractical and hazardous. Today, for example, the car parking spaces were full - so how to see there is cycle parking? There's no signage. And how to get to it? And how to leave - likely with an even heavier cycle than when you arrived? But, and this feels like a new thing here, if people can park motor vehicles next to the cycle parking they can choose to reverse in. This is what the drivers of the two vehicles nearest to the camera location have done. Neither is electric. So both pumped out particles and noxious smells straight into the covered area - ie not well ventilated - on arrival. And they will do so again when they leave. At child height (see: #189180). An acquaintance had a health practice on the ground floor of a building surrounded by car parking - with no buffer space. Her only option for ventilating the space, which got very hot in summer, was to open windows. But some drivers reversed into the spaces filling her practice with pollution both on arrival and on departure. She got notices put up on the building walls asking drivers not to reverse into the spaces next to the building. That's not possible here. So, does this need to be taught as part of the driving test? Other image here today and links: #189180.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
189180Photo #189180[Image taken 8.1.23] Aldi, Water Lane, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Child’s cycle secured on its own at Aldi (stores.aldi.co.uk/york/water-lane) today. Did the child cycle and the parent walk? A cheering sight. (Another customer smiled and remarked on it too.) It’s early January. It was dry. But it wasn’t warm. Other image here today: #189181. Other image today and links: #189177.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
189179Photo #189179[Image taken 8.1.23] Wickes, Lysander Close, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] I persevere with campaigning for cycle parking including at retail outlets: getting it installed; getting it upgraded; getting it better spaced. Why? Because people like to cycle. But to do so they need cycle parking at their destination. And provision that is easy to find, easy to use... This family had come from Wigginton. They have a car. The father said they could have driven here today. He explained he drives 20 miles a day but the traffic makes the journeys unpleasant. (As the children were with him, I didn't point out, he is part of the traffic.) So he chooses to cycle at weekends/when he can. The son who had not enjoyed cycling now uses his bike to get to school - 20 miles/week. And hasn't missed a day since starting in September. Given the minus temperatures in December 2022 that is commendable. It was clear the boy now enjoys cycling. By contrast the daughter always liked using her bike. This family will motivate me to continue lobbying for practical cycle parking provision, safe routes, safe roads, etc, etc. Other image here today and links: #189177.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
189178Photo #189178[Image taken 8.1.23] Wickes, Lysander Close, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Is the notice in response to practice such as this: #182124? Proactive action by the company. Other image here today and links: #189177.General sign/notice:
Good practice
signs
189177Photo #189177[Image taken 8.1.23] Wickes, Lysander Close, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location] Wickes’ (www.wickes.co.uk/store/8471) racks were the busiest I’ve seen them. Our group of two, another customer on his own, a family of three (see: #189179), plus the cycle of an employee. A case of: “If you install them, they (customers) will come”?. Or, "If you clear the clutter, customers will use them"? Compare with: #181645. Other image here today: #189178. Other images today: #189180, #189181.Cycle parking:
Good practice
cycleparking
189175Photo #189175[UPDATE: On 25.1.23 I noticed paving stone is no longer loose. [Image taken 5.1.23] 29 Filey Terrace, York. Context and links: #189174.Other:
Problem
general
189174Photo #189174[Image taken 5.1.23] Filey Terrace, York. This small flag is wobbly. It catches you unawares when you put your weight on it. Location: #189175. Other image today and links: #189172. Other ongoing problem in Filey Terrace: #188672.Other:
Problem
general
189173Photo #189173[Image taken 5.1.23] Clifton Backies, York. [NOTE: No street view at this location.] Location of the missing direction post. Context and links: #189172.Route sign:
Problem
routesigns

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